scorecardresearch
Tuesday, Nov 29, 2022
Premium

‘I have always strived to create pieces that are comfortable but can be defined as wearable art’: Fashion designer Rimzim Dadu

"The most satisfying part of the journey has been that I never compromised on my design ethics – there was always pressure 'to do the usual as it sells'. But I never gave into that and I feel happy that today we have clients from across the world who appreciate what we do," she said.

The pandemic was horrible, to say the least. But it also allowed us time to pause, reflect and set our priorities.The pandemic was horrible, to say the least. But it also allowed us time to pause, reflect and set our priorities, she said. (Photo: PR handout)

When Rimzim Dadu says that the “usual bores” her, and that she is naturally inclined towards “exploring the unknown qualities of a material”, it comes as no surprise. That is because the fashion designer is known for experimenting with varied textiles, materials, and surfaces — like silicone, metallic cords, stainless steel — and creating jaw-dropping ensembles that go on to become timeless pieces.

So it was not surprising that her latest collection, showcased after a gap of almost two years at the Lakme Fashion Week, was about all this and much more — as she describes it as “an opportunity to take a pause, breathe and connect with people and their stories from around the world”. Talking more about it, Rimzim tells us about the influences, being a part of the industry for 15 years, working with diverse materials to create magic, styling Bollywood divas, and also shares the most challenging thing about being a designer. Excerpts:

How was it showcasing at the Lakme Fashion Week — held after a gap of two years?

It was exciting to get back to doing physical shows as nothing beats the energy and excitement of showcasing your work in front of a live audience. The idea behind ‘A Sea of Million Stories’ was to celebrate love in all its forms. This was particularly important given what we have gone through in the past two years. Stories bind us together as human beings but in the fast-paced world, we forget to pause and listen to each other, to know each other. Our curated lives on social media drown out the real us. A Sea of Million Stories was an opportunity to take a pause, breathe and connect with people and their stories from around the world. The show temporarily disconnected people from their realities and allowed them time to immerse, learn, and be inspired by others.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Rimzim Dadu (@rimzimdaduofficial)

The visual extravaganza started from the moment people entered the space and a sky full of diamonds engulfed in clouds, ignited by tiny love notes. They walked into the space which was intimately lit by 150 lamps and covered in a slow haze of fog that created the effect of as if one was walking through clouds. The short love notes they stop to read were something that touched a chord. The show began with three people telling their interpretation of love – there was Gaia – who talked about finally accepting her identity and transitioning, there was Nitya Arora who talked about the importance of learning even from heartbreaks and the final act was Anand Bhushan who talked about his idea of love and the bond he felt with his dog and how he still remembers even years after he is gone.

The space was designed by celebrated architect Rajat Sodhi – who is a co-founder of Orproject – he was inspired by coral reefs and how space became such an important thing during the pandemic – none of us can forget six feet social distancing messages. The show also proved that designers need to be more open about actively collaborating with artists and creators from other streams. The show would not have been possible without Rajat.

Tell us about your latest collection — A Sea of Million Stories. What is its USP?

In the latest collection, clean lines meet new age craftsmanship. Our signature cord technique in re-engineered material, re-imagines cocktail dressing to create fluid yet structured forms. This collection takes inspiration from natural elements around us, the ripples and waves in the sea, the texture of a river bed, the tropics and the ever-changing skies. Clean cuts, sharp silhouettes and molten metallics come together to form a range of exclusive women’s and menswear cocktail dressing. With hints of metallic blues and emeralds combined with sparkly silvers and pristine whites – the collection embodies rich hues and modern sculpted forms: the ultimate combination of contemporary and luxury ready to wear. Paired with exquisite natural diamond jewellery the set will seamlessly blend panache with slow fashion and a sustainable lifestyle.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Rimzim Dadu (@rimzimdaduofficial)

How much did the pandemic affect the collection — from ideation to final creations?

Advertisement

The pandemic was horrible, to say the least. But it also allowed us time to pause, reflect and set our priorities. I am always inspired by everyday things around us and this collection was all about nature – the ripples of the sea and beautiful patterns of the foliage around us. Those elements from nature were interoperated in our re-engineered textiles.

You are known to work with certain unusual materials like silicone, metallic cords, stainless steel, and also paper. How do you describe your design philosophy?

I have always strived to create pieces that are comfortable but can be defined as wearable art. “The usual” bores me and I naturally gravitate towards exploring the unknown qualities of a material. For example, the tough steel becomes malleable and wearable, the soft chiffon becomes grunge – we constantly break apart material and then put them together in different ways to see the outcome. This constant experimentation produces pieces that gain cult status – like our steel-wire sarees. People are increasingly looking for pieces that are different and help them own their personalities and we can’t serve them without constant experimentations. But at the same time, clothes have to be technically perfect and there can’t be any compromise on that.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Rimzim Dadu (@rimzimdaduofficial)

The last two years have been extremely tough for the fashion industry — what has been your biggest lockdown learning, personally and professionally?

Advertisement

As I said before, the lockdown allowed me time to pause and think. But at the same time, it tested me as I saw loss very closely. My biggest learning from lockdown has been to never take anything for granted and enjoy little moments in life instead of constantly chasing that big dream. The lockdown was tough as it was challenge to keep our factories running while keeping the team safe. For a few months, we created a hostel kind of set up where ethe team stayed in the office and worked together – it brought the team together.

You are among B-Town’s favourite designers. Which celeb do you feel carries your creations the best?

I love stars who like experimenting with their clothes. From Sonam Kapoor to Alia Bhat, many celebs have done justice to our iconic steel saree, so I wouldn’t take just one name!

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Rimzim Dadu (@rimzimdaduofficial)

How long did it take you to create your latest collection, and what was the most challenging aspect of the same?

For than the time, it was the excitement of getting back to physical shows that drove us. The challenging part was to again getting used to the madness of the show preps and everything that goes with it.

 You have been a part of the industry for about 15 years now; how would you describe your journey?

Advertisement

I would say I am happy with what I have achieved but there still a long distance to go. The most satisfying part of the journey has been that I never compromised on my design ethics – there was always pressure “to do the usual as it sells”. But I never gave into that and I feel happy that today we have clients from across the world who appreciate what we do.

What, do you feel, is the most challenging thing about being a designer in India?

Advertisement

I would say the most important bit is staying true to what you believe in and never giving into market pressures. That’s the most challenging part.

Subscriber Only Stories
UPSC Key- November 29, 2022: Why you should read ‘Executive Vs Judiciary’...Premium
Delhi Confidential: Ahead of Gujarat polls, BJP worries about NOTA votesPremium
Agrarian Punjab diesel-driven; Delhi opts for cleaner optionsPremium
The shadow of 1979: Iran and Saudi Arabia are fighting Islamism; Pakistan...Premium

📣 For more lifestyle news, follow us on Instagram | Twitter | Facebook and don’t miss out on the latest updates!

First published on: 12-04-2022 at 12:30:24 pm
Next Story

Karnataka: 4 held for vandalising Muslim vendors’ pushcarts near temple

Latest Comment
Post Comment
Read Comments
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
close