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Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Masaba Gupta launches the ‘hijab-sari’ as part of her spring/summer 2018 collection

Designer Masaba Gupta, who is known for unconventional and experimental outfits, released her spring/summer 2018 collection, known as 'Tiger Lily', which includes a gray and white 'hijab-sari' with tribal prints all over it. 

By: Lifestyle Desk | New Delhi | Updated: March 26, 2018 7:26:14 pm
Masaba Gupta, Masaba Gupta hijab sari, hijab sari, Masaba Gupta spring/summer collection 2018, tiger lily, masaba gupta tiger lily, tommy hilfiger, oscar de la renta, mango, house of fraser, kallol datta, dolce and gabbana, indian express, indian express news Designer Masaba Gupta designs the ‘hijab-sari’ for her latest collection. (Source: File Photo; designed by Nidhi Mishra)

In January 2016, Dolce & Gabbana released a collection of hijabs and abayas as part of their ‘modest wear’ range for Muslim customers staying in the Middle East. Even other high-end international brands like Tommy Hilfiger, Oscar de la Renta and Mango introduced kaftans and hijab-inspired outfits as part of their Ramdan clothing collections while House of Frasers designed athleisure hijabs for women to wear while exercising.

Closer home, in 2015, Kolkata-based designer Kallol Datta introduced a range of hijabs featuring embellished detailing and 3D prints. Now, designer Masaba Gupta, who is known for her unconventional and experimental outfits, released her spring/summer 2018 collection, known as ‘Tiger Lily’, which includes a gray and white ‘hijab-sari’ with tribal prints all over it.

Masaba Gupta, Masaba Gupta hijab sari, hijab sari, Masaba Gupta spring/summer collection 2018, tiger lily, masaba gupta tiger lily, tommy hilfiger, oscar de la renta, mango, house of fraser, kallol datta, dolce and gabbana, indian express, indian express news The ‘hijab-sari’ designed by Masaba Gupta as part of her Spring/Summer 2018 Collection titled ‘Tiger Lily’.

In an interview to Mid-day.com, when the designer was asked about her choice to pick a symbol of conservatism, she said, “The starting point of the idea was to talk about our best-seller sarees. And the saree has been constantly debated in relation to how it should be worn by a specific type of woman to why the youth are apprehensive about embracing it. That’s why the decision to showcase the saree worn by real women, as opposed to models, in the campaign shoot. Middle Eastern women think that a saree is intrinsically Indian, hence the idea of styling this drape like a hijab”. She further added, “My job as a designer is done when my clothes inspire freedom in Muslim women to adopt fashion the way they desire.”

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