Dramatic Flair

The people, collections and trends at Lotus Makeup India Fashion Week Spring-Summer 2019

Written by Ektaa Malik | Updated: October 15, 2018 12:20:22 am

Lotus make up India fashion week, Wendell rodricks, fashion, Indian Express (From far left) Designs by Wendell Rodricks; Atsushi Nakashima; Abhishek Gupta & Nandita Basu; Munkee.See Munkee.

FROM vibrant colour blocking by Schulen Fernandes for Wendell Rodricks, to botanical prints by Payal Pratap and gossamer fabrics by Rahul Mishra — day two and three of the Lotus Make Up India Fashion Week (LMIFW) saw a mixed bag. While designers Prashant Verma and Nitin Bal Chauhan showcased their collections after a hiatus, Japanese designer Atsushi Nakashima displayed in India for the first time and Abhishek Gupta and Nandita Basu of the former label Fightercock made a comeback on the Delhi ramp. Here’s what we liked:

Great Expectations

While attitude and poise are the favoured go-to attributes for most models, things get interesting when someone sways, sashes and jumps on the ramp. Dubbed as the new Twiggy of India by none other than Wendell Rodricks himself, 17-year-old KyaraCoelho has everything going for her. Currently studying at St Xavier’s College in Mumbai, Coelho made her ramp debut for SchulenFernandes for Wendell Rodricks’ The Wow Factor Collection. “Wendell had me do the look book shoot and asked me to walk the ramp for LMIFW, which was a dream come true,” says Coelho. Mumbai-based Coelho credits Anna Bredmeyer for training her, and hopes she can continue this journey. “Ever since I was a child, I’ve loved being on the stage. But it’s only a year ago that I gave a serious thought to modelling,” says Coelho, who is passionate about food and music. Given that Rodricks is credited for discovering the likes of Deepika Padukone and Anushka Sharma; Coelho is someone to watch out for.

Vintage Vibes

Japanese designer Atsushi Nakashima, who has been the former head of Jean Paul Gaultier men’s and women’s diffusion line, displayed Revival, a collection that borrowed heavily from the rollicking sixties. The designer, on his maiden visit to India, imbibed psychedelic pop art on geometric prints. One also saw an interplay of Japanese minimalism with a dramatic maximum — tight-fitted ensembles with little or no embellishments, clean cut lines and sharp silhouettes, paired with a flowy tunic with an asymmetrical helm. Printed textured heels and turbans added to that effect. The designer, who spoke no English, was very impressed with the deftness of Indian embroidery. “ That’s something I want to take back. I know embroidery and embellishments are used to create drama, but we can use them in a minimalist way as well,” says Nakashima, who after his stint in Italy has set up his eponymous label in Japan.

The Birds and the Bees

They last showcased in 2008, when they were expecting their daughter to be born. Ten years later, designers Abhishek Gupta and Nandita Basu have collaborated again and have taken pollinators — bees, birds and butterflies as the centre focal point of their diffusion collection ‘Pollination’. “After 2008, I shifted my focus to developing my own brand, and focusing on developing high end audio. Nandita wanted a break. So now when I wanted to come back to fashion, what better fit than to do it with Nandita,” says Gupta, who started working with Basu in 2000. The collection used chanderi, tulle, and gold lame, in shades of black, warm green and a smattering of scarlet and gold. The duo first collaborated in 2006, for their line Fightercock. “We showed the line for four seasons, and we wish to bring the same passion and vision back. Pollination was just a warm up act.”

Arm Candy

Wicker baskets have come a long way from their utilitarian days when they ferried food for summer picnics. They now have their place of pride in the Indian ramps, where the ilk of Payal Pratap, Pero and others imbibing is as part of their aesthetic. Munkee.See Munkee. Do have long favoured them and have used them extensively. Be it the slender kinds that hang from an elbow, or the square, squat ones with a handle, they add a layer of noticeable chic to the ensemble. They have been contemporarised further with lace, buttons and clasps.

For all the latest Lifestyle News, download Indian Express App

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement