National Book Awards 2018: Here are the best books of the yearhttps://indianexpress.com/article/lifestyle/books/national-book-awards-2018-best-books-of-2018-5447996/

National Book Awards 2018: Here are the best books of the year

Apart from Translated Literature category, the panel bestowed honours to books in the categories of Young People's Literature, Poetry, Non - fiction, and Fiction.

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Here’s the best literature of 2018. (Source: National Book Award)

Yesterday night, the winners of the 2018 National Book Awards were announced at a ceremony in New York City. For the first time ever, this year The National Book Foundation, that sponsored the 69th National Book Awards, introduced an award for the Translated Literature category. Apart from this, the panel bestowed honours to books in the categories of Young People’s Literature, Poetry, Non – fiction, and Fiction.

Here is a roundup of the best books of the year.

Fiction: The Friend by Sigrid Nunez

The recipient of several awards including a Whiting Writers’ Award, the Rome Prize in Literature, and a Berlin Prize Fellowship, Sigrid Nunez in her latest offering writes a moving story of love, friendship, grief, healing, and the magical bond between a woman and her dog.

Poetry: Indecency by Justin Phillip Reed

Justin Phillip Reed, in his debut collection of poetry, addresses a range of issues like race, white supremacy, sexuality, and repressive state action.

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Nonfiction: The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke by Jeffrey C. Stewart

In his book The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke, Jeffrey C Stewart pays tribute to the life and legacy of Alain Locke, the father of the Harlem Renaissance and a mentor to Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, to name a few.

Translated Literature: The Emissary by Yoko Tawada, translated by Margaret Mitsutani

In this dystopian novel, Yoko Tawada imagines a story set in Japan where children are born terribly weak and the elderly have the strength to survive.

Young People’s Literature: The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo

This New York Times-bestselling novel-in-verse by an award-winning slam poet, Elizabeth Acevedo, is about an Afro-Latina heroine who tells her story with truth and powerful words.