Bookmarked: What you should read this Octoberhttps://indianexpress.com/article/lifestyle/books/bookmarked-what-you-should-read-this-october-6050810/

Bookmarked: What you should read this October

In order to help you stay abreast with new novels that come out every month but tend to get lost in the crowd, here's a list that will help you decide what to read and what not to by telling you what all to look forward to every month.

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For the month of October, here are the books to keep a lookout for. (Designed by Gargi Singh/The Indian Express)

Books can engage, jolt, inform and rectify. A 200-page novel can change your perception or reaffirm your opinion. It is impossible to predict where a book can lead you to. It is equally impossible to know which one to pick from the pile one often encounters at a bookstore.

In order to help you stay abreast with the new novels that come out every month but tend to get lost in the crowd, here’s a list that will help you decide what to read and what not to by telling you what to look forward to every month.

Much like last month, we are here to help you decide which books to keep a lookout in October.

International titles

Grand Union by Zadie Smith

Zadie Smith moves across history, cuts through perspectives to present a dazzling new book. (Source: Amazon.in)

Zadie Smith is one of the most assertive voices of our times. This time around she is back with her first short story collection. Consisting of her 11 new short stories and some of those published in The New Yorker and other places, the collection promises to be a treat for the readers. The On Beauty author moves across history, cuts through perspectives to present a dazzling new book. It is published by Random Penguin House.

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Blue Moon by Lee Child

In this new instalment of the suspense series, Reacher supposedly meets his most formidable opponent. (Source: Amazon.in)

With his new book, Child brings his familiar protagonist Jack Reacher back.  In this new instalment of the suspense series, Reacher supposedly meets his most formidable opponent. It is published by Random Penguin House.

Letters from an Astrophysicist by Neil deGrasse Tyson

The book consists of handpicked 100 letters and ensure to be an engaging and intriguing read.  (Source: Amazon.in)

Neil deGrasse Tyson has a staggering following of readers owing to the way he has made science accessible. With his new book, he reveals an irreverent side of his by sharing his correspondence with readers over the years. The book consists of handpicked 100 letters and ensure to be an engaging and intriguing read. It is published by Random Penguin House.

Indian titles

A Window Lived In A Wall by Vinod Kumar Shukla

Weaving a tale of marriage and elephant, the novel is rich in imagination.

Translated from Hindi by Satti Khanna 

Originally published in 2005, this translation will enable readers versed in English to experience Vinod Kumar Shukla’s words. He is known for the way he presents the inner, private lives of his characters and this novel is no different. Weaving a tale of marriage and elephant, the novel is rich in imagination. This is published by Westland.

Wizards: The Story of Indian Spin Bowling by Anindya Dutta

Anindya Dutta is a banker by profession and a cricket fanatic by choice.

With changing formats, cricket has increasingly become batsmen’s game. But different styles of bowling carry equally fascinating history. Anindya Dutta, a banker by profession and a cricket fanatic by choice, traces the history of Indian spin bowling in this and how over the years Indian bowlers perfected it and dominated world cricket. Informative and anecdotal, Dutta’s book promises some surprise deliveries. This is published by Westland.

Kohinoor Express by Rensil D’Silva

Rensil D’Silva plays with India’s enduring fixation with kohinoor to weave an engaging read.

In 1850, Governor-General Dalhousie has just won the Third Sikh War and he intends to gift Queen Victoria the legendary Kohinoor but the route from Punjab to Bombay is infiltrated with bandits. Indians leave no stone unturned to prevent the diamond from being transported to England, even if that means taking the help of most-wanted bandit, Ajmera. He, however, is in prison.

Rensil D’Silva plays with India’s enduring fixation with kohinoor to weave an engaging read. This is published by Westland.

The Battle Of Pakistan by Shuja Nawaz

Shuja Nawaz, in this books, attempts to unravel the difficult relationship shared by Pakistan and the US.

The tumultuous relationship between Pakistan and the United States need no retelling. In The Battle for Pakistan, Shuja Nawaz attempts to unravel this complex and complicated relationship shared by the two nations. The book holds more importance and relevance when placed within the present context. It will be published by Penguin Random House India.

Khaki Files: Inside Stories of Police Missions by Neeraj Kumar

Neeraj Kumar in his recent novel upholds the untiring service by the police force

Neeraj Kumar, the former commissioner of police, Delhi, in his recent novel looks at several landmark cases, ranging from the terrorist attack on the Indian Parliament on December 13, 2001, to the Nirbhaya incident on December 1, 2012 and upholds the untiring service by the police force. It will be published by Penguin Random House India.

Dopehri by Pankaj Kapur

Pankaj Kapur delves into fiction with Dopehri.

Actor and theatre personality Pankaj Kapur delves into fiction with Dopehri. Amma Bi, an elderly widow, lives alone in Lucknow and every day, like an unsaid ritual, she hears footsteps outside. She looks and finds no one. In order to escape, she takes a lodger and what started out as a portrait of a lone woman, transforms into a delightful tale of companionship and empathy. It will be published by Harper Collins India.

Dara Shukoh: The Man Who Would Be King by Avik Chanda

In this book, the author cuts through the myths and anecdotes surrounding him to bring to life the enigmatic prince.

Perhaps the most fascinating aspect about history is how inexhaustive it is and how a new perspective changes a familiar tale. In this book by Avik Chanda, the author looks at Dara Shukoh, Shah Jahan’s favourite son, and heir-apparent to the Mughal throne before being defeated by Aurangzeb. Although common narrative has shown me as an incompetent prince who was tolerant towards different faiths, in this book the author cuts through the myths and anecdotes surrounding him to bring to life the enigmatic prince, and by doing that also captures a compelling picture of history. It will be published by Harper Collins India.

ALSO READ | Bookmarked: What you should read this September

Happy reading!

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(Bookmarked is a monthly guide to help you decide which books to keep a lookout for)