Meltem Isik’s powerful photos capture the complexities of living with body dysmorphiahttps://indianexpress.com/article/lifestyle/art-and-culture/photographer-meltem-isik-body-dysmorphia-photo-exhibition-5459270/

Meltem Isik’s powerful photos capture the complexities of living with body dysmorphia

Meltem Isik photographed people with Body Dysmorphic Disorder. Although the series took its final shape as a photographic installation, the process is closely akin to sculpture and performance.

body dysmorphic disorder BDD
Meltem Isik’s work started forming around the impossibility of seeing oneself as a complete figure without the help of external devices. (Source: meltem-isik.com)

In an age where washboard abs and hourglass figure are hailed as the epitome of beauty, the need for body positivity is probably more important than ever. With celebs like Lady Gaga and closer to home, Ileana D’Cruz talking about body image issues and the efforts needed to keep it in check, the struggle is real. What we don’t realise is that because of the selfie-culture, almost everyone is a bit body dysmorphic these days and to highlight the issue, Istanbul-based photographer Meltem Isik came out with a series of photographic installations.

“Project ‘Twice into the stream’ can be thought as an inquiry into the way we see and perceive the human body. The complexity that originates from the capability of our bodies to see and be seen simultaneously provides the basis of the work that I construct using different viewpoints”, reads a statement on her official site.

Check some of the images here.

Body Dysmorphic Disorder, Body Image Issues
Twice into the stream (Untitled #15), 2011. Pigment-based archival print on fine art paper, 210×140 cm. (Source: meltem-isik.com)

Body Dysmorphic Disorder, Body Image Issues
Twice into the stream (Untitled #1), 2011. Pigment-based archival print on fine art paper, 210×140 cm. (Source: meltem-isik.com)

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Body Dysmorphic Disorder, Body Image Issues
Twice into the stream (Untitled #7), 2011. Pigment-based archival print on fine art paper, 210×140 cm. (Source: meltem-isik.com)

She further adds, “Although the series took its final shape as a photographic installation, my process is closely akin to sculpture and performance. To me, these are living, breathing, transient, three-dimensional pieces that I photograph for documentation. The work started forming around the impossibility of seeing oneself as a complete figure without the help of external devices. What we can see with our bare eyes is a headless body, a restricted view of what is below the neck, with the extended difficulty of seeing our back. Observing the bodies of other people, offers me a possibility to reflect on the way I see and relate to my own body, which I can never see as a whole.”