Once Upon a Time: A co-working space in Pune comes alive with stories from Indian literaturehttps://indianexpress.com/article/lifestyle/art-and-culture/indian-literature-story-telling-platform-5685106/

Once Upon a Time: A co-working space in Pune comes alive with stories from Indian literature

The event, held earlier this month, featured storytellers, timeless tales and an involved audience.

A story session in progress.

“…The thrill of adventure once again triumphed love. Tarapada once again was off to a new journey.” The picturesque setting of Inscape Co-Work was filled with applause as Erica Taraporevala finished her narration. Rabindranath Tagore’s Atithi and its retelling by Erica won over everyone’s heart with its timeless charm.

The event, held earlier this month, featured storytellers, timeless tales and an involved audience. Taraporevala says that storytelling is an art just like writing. Voice modulation, narration style, and many more components come to play while telling a story. “Timeless tales is a concept which my friends and I came up with to open up a space for professional storytellers to perform. We have been doing these sessions once in two months with different themes. For example last time our theme was ‘Hidden gems from Mahabharata’. These different themes bring out different stories in various styles,” adds Taraporevala.

Dola, one of the minds behind ‘Timeless Tales’ said that storytelling is an amalgamation of the author’s style and the narrator’s touch to it. She added, “Sometimes we even have to add some details to make some facts more believable so that the audience can enjoy.” She also believes that every Indian is a storyteller because we are quite expressive in our daily lives.

Talking about dramatic touch to a story, use of instruments has always been there in storytelling. This was incorporated in Taraporevala’s narration as she used percussion instruments to show the audience a vision of kirtankaars in her narration. She insisted that rather than telling a story, the audience needs to visualise the characters. And adding music not only adds more information but is also entertainment.

The evening was concluded with a light-hearted narration of Ismat Chughtai’s iconic story, Ek Shauhar ke Khatir. The narrator, Seema, talked about how she chooses her stories. “The story has to speak to you otherwise you can’t do justice to it,” she says. With a promise to present more jewels from the hidden corners of literature, more storytelling sessions are in line for the upcoming months.