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Wednesday, June 16, 2021

In New York, artist Maya Lin’s ‘Ghost Forest’ warns on rising sea water

The trees, some of them 80 years old, are from the Atlantic Pine Barrens of New Jersey, which is about 100 miles (160 km) from downtown Manhattan

By: Reuters | New York |
May 11, 2021 10:30:40 pm
A man photographs "Ghost Forest" an art installation designed by artist Maya Lin in Madison Square Park in the Manhattan. (Photo: Reuters)

In the center of New York City’s spring greenery, artist Maya Lin has installed the barren, brown trunks of 49 dead Atlantic White Cedar trees in a Manhattan park as a Ghost Forest to warn of the danger of climate change and the threat of rising seawater.

“This is a grove of Atlantic Cedars… victims of saltwater inundation from rising seas due to climate change,” said Lin, designer of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC.

A couple pass by “Ghost Forest” an art installation designed by artist Maya Lin in Madison Square Park in the Manhattan borough of New York City. (Photo: Reuters)

“They’re called, ‘Ghost Forests,’ so I wanted to bring a ghost forest to raise awareness about this phenomenon,” she added, noting that more than 50% of Atlantic Cedars on the U.S. Eastern Seaboard have been lost.

The trees, some of them 80 years old, are from the Atlantic Pine Barrens of New Jersey, which is about 100 miles (160 km) from downtown Manhattan.

The Empire State Building is seen towering over “Ghost Forest” an art installation designed by artist Maya Lin. (Photo: Reuters)

The exhibit in Madison Square Park, in the shadow of the Empire State Building, will be displayed until Nov. 14.

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