On World Teacher’s Day, UNESCO highlights an ‘underpaid, undervalued’ professionhttps://indianexpress.com/article/jobs/on-world-teachers-day-unesco-highlights-an-underpaid-undervalued-profession-6054781/

On World Teacher’s Day, UNESCO highlights an ‘underpaid, undervalued’ profession

The world needs almost 69 million new teachers to meet the Education 2030 Agenda. 'With teachers being underpaid and undervalued, attracting and retaining talent is a challenge,' said UNESCO.

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World Teacher’s Day is celebrated on October 5. (Representational image)

On World Teachers’ Day, UNESCO addressed some critical challenges plaguing the profession, including the shortage of teachers, several of whom are underpaid, and high attrition rates. It said it aimed to make the profession among the first choices for talented young individuals in its agenda this year.

This year, the theme of World Teachers’ Day, celebrated annually on October 5, is ‘Young Teachers: The Future of the Profession’.

As per the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS), the world needs almost 69 million new teachers to meet the Education 2030 Agenda. Global inequalities could directly increase, as 70 per cent of sub-Saharan countries face acute shortages of teachers, rising to 90 per cent at the secondary level, it added.

“Without a new generation of motivated teachers, millions of learners will miss out, or continue to miss out, on their right to a quality education. With teachers being underpaid and undervalued, attracting and retaining talent is a challenge. Attrition rates are rising rapidly worldwide, due in part to precarious employment and scarce opportunities for continuous professional development. Furthermore, there is a lack of resources for children with special education needs and disabilities, refugees and multilingual pupils,” read a statement issued by Audrey Azoulay, Director-General of UNESCO, Guy Ryder, Director-General, International Labour Organization, Henrietta H. Fore, Executive Director, UNICEF, Achim Steiner, Administrator, UNDP and David Edwards, General Secretary, Education International.

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In India, the profession also faces a wide gender gap. India has 2,05,339 more male teachers than females, according to the Higher Education report 2017-18. Of the total 12,84,755 teachers across India, 57.99 per cent are males. The gender gap becomes wider as we move higher up the hierarchy.

The situation is worse in Bihar and Jharkhand where only 20.93 per cent and 29.87 per cent of teachers are females, respectively. Male candidates also dominate teaching in Maharashtra (39.76 per cent females), Odisha (35.77 per cent females), Telangana (38.38%), UP (32.84 per cent) and West Bengal (34.58 per cent). Check what is the status in your state

However, a reverse trend is shown in Dadara and Nagar Haveli where 96 per cent of its 205 teachers are females. In Kerala (60.91 per cent), Chandigarh (58.62 per cent) and Delhi (56.17 per cent) teachers are females. Goa, Haryana and Punjab also have 54.97 per cent, 52.38 per cent and 55.45 per cent female teachers.