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Saturday, October 23, 2021

Odisha: In Maoist-hit district, patchy electricity, internet mean long queues outside banks

Around 50 km away, outside the Bengaon branch of the bank, there are rows of bank passbooks on the ground as villagers squat alongside. Further away, in Thuamul Rampur block, the crowd outside the Utkal Grameen Bank started swelling from 6.30 am, four hours before opening.

Written by Aishwarya Mohanty | Kalahandi |
Updated: October 6, 2021 8:16:54 am
Maoists districts, odisha maoists affected places, maoists odisha, odisha news today, left wing extremism odisha, odisha development, slow internet, Kalahandi news, Odisha news, Indian express newsVillagers wait outside a bank in Kalahandi. (Photo: Aishwarya Mohanty)

Tilotama Majhi stands in a long queue outside the Musanal branch of State Bank of India, cradling her infant son. This is her second visit to the bank in three days and she still doesn’t know if she can withdraw the Rs 1,000 that desperately needs for her mother’s medicines. She has been waiting six hours and the bank server is down — for the fourth day in a row.

Around 50 km away, outside the Bengaon branch of the bank, there are rows of bank passbooks on the ground as villagers squat alongside. Further away, in Thuamul Rampur block, the crowd outside the Utkal Grameen Bank started swelling from 6.30 am, four hours before opening.

Across blocks in Kalahandi, one of the six Odisha districts affected by Left Wing Extremism, patchy internet, erratic electricity supply and poor banking penetration have made digital transactions a tedious, long-drawn affair for villagers, often involving multiple failed visits and resulting in forfeited earnings. In these areas, each bank branch often caters to nearly 200 villages.

Villagers seen waiting outside the Bengaon branch of State Bank of India. (Express Photo/Aishwarya Mohanty)

In a recent meeting with Home Minister Amit Shah, Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik had asked the Centre to improve banking facilities in LWE-affected areas, saying banking correspondents “cannot be a replacement for banks in these areas”.

As she breastfeeds her infant, Tilotama says, “My MGNREGA wages come to this bank. I need the money for my mother’s medicines. My son is young and needs to be fed, so I cannot leave him at home.” This morning, Tilotama, along with six other women, left home at 5 am and travelled 9 km on foot from their village Sindhibahali, under Bhatangpadar gram panchayat in Lanjigarh block of the district.

Lanjigrah and Thuamul Rampur blocks in Kalahandi are among the worst affected by Maoism. Lanjigarh block, with 197 revenue villages and a population of nearly 48,000, has five banks and seven customer service points. Thuamul Rampur block, with 298 villages and a population of 77,840, has two banks and 10 customer service points.

Around 50 km from the Musanal branch is SBI’s Bengaon branch where villagers have been waiting for hours. With a single BSNL mobile tower catering to villages in a 15-km radius, the signal is usually very weak and the bank server routinely breaks down. Villagers claim to have spent nights outside the banks, waiting for the server to be restored. Today is no different.

“To withdraw money, we end up losing a day’s wages, sometimes two,” says Krushna Bhakta, 59, who has travelled 20 km from his Parapadar village.

Bhakta hopes to withdraw Rs 2,000 for “household needs” but doesn’t know how much money his account has. “I have a passbook, but I don’t understand anything that’s written here. The bank sahibs will help me,” he says.

An official at the Bengaon branch says, “Until and unless there is better connectivity, there is nothing we can do. We have four systems (one main server, two computers and an ATM) connected with satellite connectivity. But it gets disrupted due to bad weather. Electricity is another issue. There are times when there is power failure at a stretch for days. And there’s usually no way to inform villagers and they get to know after reaching the bank, after having travelled so far.”

With money from welfare schemes being credited to bank accounts of beneficiaries, over the last few years, the crowd at banks has substantially increased, but the digital infrastructure has not kept pace. “All kinds of transactions at banks here are digitised. Customers are given tokens and are allowed inside according to their token number. But because of power failure and internet issues, the token numbers are often carried forward to the next day,” says an official.

With money from welfare schemes being credited to bank accounts of beneficiaries, over the last few years, the crowd at banks has substantially increased, but the digital infrastructure has not kept pace. (Express photo/Aishwarya Mohanty)

“We are only able to help people withdraw money. The system does not support any other activities such as creating a new account or linking accounts. If any beneficiary comes here with these requests we have to turn them away and request them to go to another bank with better connectivity… about 30 km away,” the official adds.

A group of women from Tarapadar village have pooled in money for a vehicle to bring them to Utkal Grameen Bank in Thuamul Rampur block. “We spend Rs 50-70 each time we come here. If there are no vehicles we walk. At times we have to make a second trip the next day to withdraw money,” says Rupa Nayak.

These visits to the bank usually means no cooking at home.”Earlier when schools were open, our children would eat there. Now since they are at home, they have to fend for themselves. Since we leave home very early in the morning, it is difficult to cook,” says Rupa.

An official at the Bengaon branch says, “Unless there is better connectivity, there is nothing we can do. Electricity is another issue — sometimes there is no power for days together.”

Admitting that lack of connectivity is a major hurdle in the banking system, Dhruba Singh, Lead District Manager of Kalahandi, who coordinates between banks and the government, says, “… To make the banking system more accessible, we have started setting up Customer Service Points (CST). The idea is to have a CST in each gram panchayat. But even for these points, connectivity is a must. Work is also underway on Bharat Broadband Network (BBNL)…”

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