Faridkot ruler’s kin to contest court order on propertyhttps://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-others/faridkot-rulers-kin-to-contest-court-order-on-property/

Faridkot ruler’s kin to contest court order on property

The family of the brother of Maharaja Harinder Singh — the erstwhile King of Faridkot — will challenge the order of a local court by which property worth Rs 20,000 crore has passed on to the two living daughters of the Maharaja

The family of the brother of Maharaja Harinder Singh — the erstwhile King of Faridkot — will challenge the order of a local court by which property worth Rs 20,000 crore has passed on to the two living daughters of the Maharaja.

Kanwar Bharatinder Singh,whose son Amarinder Singh announced this at a press conference here today,is the son of Kanwar Manjitinder Singh,the Maharaja’a younger brother.

Amarinder said the local court had decided the issue of inheritance on the basis of the Hindu Succession Act and not on the basis of the Law of Primogeniture,which is customarily followed among the royal families when issues of inheritance arise.

“This tradition has not been followed by the court in this case despite several Supreme Court judgments having upheld its worth to deal with questions of inheritance among Royalty,” said Amarinder. He,however,added that his father will be challenging the decision of the lower court not on the basis of tradition alone. “We have with us a will of the Maharaja,which he made in 1952. This will was succeeded by the will made later under the influence of the Maharaja’s servants,which has now been found to be fake. In which case,it is the will of 1952 which has to be considered as the Maharaja’s will valid till date,” said Amarinder.

“In the 1952 will of the Maharaja he had specifically excluded his eldest daughter,Rajkumari Amrit Kaur,from the right over any of his property while giving some cash and immovable properties to his two younger daughters. The fact that the two daughters were specially mentioned as being given something means that the Maharaja meant to naturally leave everything else to his son Tikka Harmohinder Singh. Tikka,however,died before the Maharaja,” said Amarinder.

“The Maharaja had meant to follow the law of primogeniture and by that logic the next in line was his younger brother (next living male survivor) Kanwar Manjitinder Singh,my grandfather,” said Amarinder. Amarinder also gave instances of how the law of primogeniture was followed during the time of his great grandparents.

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Amarinder added that Bhartinder Singh had filed a petition challenging the Maharaja’s will in March 1992,while Rajkumari Amrit Kaur challenged it in October in the same year. “Later,the two cases were clubbed together and heard. However,the court decision while setting aside the will as fake,has also said we have no claim to the property as the law of primogeniture cannot be followed in this case. Our argument is that since there is a will of the Maharaja,which is valid,the law of succession as applied by court cannot be followed,” said Amarinder.