Explained: What is Emonet and how it can change your online experiencehttps://indianexpress.com/article/explained/what-is-emonet-and-how-it-can-change-your-online-experience-5861240/

Explained: What is Emonet and how it can change your online experience

The technology uses a complex programming algorithm which considers a range of input modes, audio and visual, of its user and draws upon other audio and visual behaviours and reactions collected and stored in its dataset to match an emotion to the user.

The term “Emonet” was coined by computer scientists Kahou, Bouthillier and Lamblin in their 2013 study.

The term “Emonet,” coined by computer scientists Kahou, Bouthillier and Lamblin in their 2013 study, is the emotion recognition ability of technology achieved through multimodal deep learning approaches. Simply put, it shows how machines are striding ahead, and can now detect their users’ emotions.

The technology uses a complex programming algorithm which considers a range of input modes, audio and visual, of its user and draws upon other audio and visual behaviours and reactions collected and stored in its dataset to match an emotion to the user.

The software was first developed in 2013 inspired by the Emotion Recognition in the Wild challenge, with the dataset initially being formed by the technology processing actors’ reactions and behaviour during a performance.

Many consider this technology revolutionary as it has the capability to alter our entire internet experience. In order to better their service, live social network sites (such as Facetime, Skype and Snapchat) would fluidly be able to tweak the services they provide to each individual consumer based on their personal mood.

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Further, sites with audio and visual content (such as YouTube, Instagram and Facebook) could sift through their own databases to suggest and provide content based on their users’ reactions and emotional mood. Online shopping sites would also be able to display products which appeal to their customers based on their reactions.

Others have expressed concerns over security and privacy issues regarding the technology.

However, detecting emotion accurately has still proven to be a challenge due to the subjective nature of what emotions are as well as the vast variety of different human behaviour and reactions to similar situations. Nonetheless, the technology has achieved an accuracy of 95.68% across Robert Plutchick’s eight primary emotion according to a paper published by professors of the University of British Colombia and the University of Pennsylvania.

Currently, the technology is still being developed. However, it is possible that this technology will become a part of internet services in the future.

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