Explained: Are there really many worlds?https://indianexpress.com/article/explained/tip-for-reading-list-are-there-really-many-worlds-6108692/

Explained: Are there really many worlds?

It is a concept that appears so weird, even to scientists, that many of them limit themselves to doing the mathematics of these probabilities.

Sean Carroll’s Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime.

Concepts of quantum mechanics have been at the centre of much recent discourse, thanks largely to the Marvel Cinematic Universe and partly to the quantum breakthrough claimed by Google.

The plots of many of the Marvel films hinge on the Many Worlds Theory, which states that if a number of outcomes are possible from an event into time, all of those events will take place along separate timelines that branch out of that event — simply put, many worlds existing simultaneously.

Quantum computing works on the principle that a bit of information can exist as 0 and 1 at the same time, and on the separate probabilities of multiple states existing . It is a concept that appears so weird, even to scientists, that many of them limit themselves to doing the mathematics of these probabilities.

Sean Carroll, a physicist at the California Institute of Technology, has now proposed that if you measure multiple possible outcomes, it means that these multiple universes do exist. “We just have to accept that there is more than one of us in the universe. There are many, many Sean Carrolls. Many of every one of us.” That is the idea Carroll explains in his new book, Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime.

“As quantum books go, Carroll’s is exceptionally clear, conversational and enjoyable. He has a knack for linguistic lubrication that helps make some highly technical concepts reasonably smooth to swallow. His is by far the most articulate and cogent defense of the Many-Worlds view in book-length depth with a close connection to the latest ongoing research (in the arena known as quantum foundations),” Science News writes in its review.