Telling Numbers: KCR assets up 55%, bank balance 12 times higherhttps://indianexpress.com/article/explained/telangana-cm-k-chandrashekar-rao-isro-pslv-launch-5475384/

Telling Numbers: KCR assets up 55%, bank balance 12 times higher

KCR has declared bank deposits totalling a little under Rs 5.64 crore, which is over 12 times as high as the Rs 44 lakh he had declared in 2014.

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Telangana caretaker Chief Minister K Chandrasekhar Rao (PTI Photo/File)

Telangana caretaker Chief Minister K Chandrashekar Rao, contesting from Gajwel, has declared assets worth Rs 23.55 crore, which is over 55% higher than the Rs 15.16 crore he had declared in 2014, when he had contested both the Lok Sabha and the Assembly elections.

In 2018, KCR has declared bank deposits totalling a little under Rs 5.64 crore, which is over 12 times as high as the Rs 44 lakh he had declared in 2014.

The jewellery in KCR and his wife’s name, worth Rs 21 lakh in 2014, has now been declared at Rs 96 lakh. On the other hand, a Rs 1 crore loan, which was due to KCR is 2014, is not part of the 2018 affidavit. Overall, the value of the declared movable assets have increased from Rs 6.50 crore to over Rs 11 crore in 2018.

The immovable assets have risen from Rs 8.65 crore to Rs 12.20 crore. This breaks up into agricultural land worth Rs 6.50 crore (up Rs 2 crore since 2014), non-agricultural land worth Rs 60 lakh (up Rs 10 lakh) and residential properties worth Rs 5.10 crore (up Rs 1.45 crore).

How it adds up

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Agri & non-agri land             7.10
Residential properties           5.10
Bank balance                         5.64
Stocks & bonds                     4.71
Jewellery and cash                1.00
Total                                     23.55
(Figures in Rs crore)

 

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This Word Means | Hyperspectral imaging

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PSLV-C43 lifts off (Source: ISRO)

On Thursday, ISRO’s rocket PSLV-C43 launched a number of new satellites, among which the major one was HysIS, or Hyperspectral Imaging Satellite (HysIS). Hyperspectral imaging is a technique that creates images with features that would not have been visible to the naked eye. It works by dividing the electromagnetic spectrum into a large number of narrow bands, which helps characterise objects in an image with great precision and detail. In an explainer on its website, the Kansas Institute of Technology’s Institute of Microstructure Technology describes hyperspectral imaging as enabling “the acquisition of spatially-resolved spectral information by acquiring a spectrum for each pixel in an image using many contiguous narrow spectral bands”. Applications range from remote sensing to agriculture, diagnostics, and environmental monitoring.

The primary mission of HysIS, as described on the ISRO website, is to study the Earth’s surface in visible, near infrared and shortwave infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. It is a result of ISRO’s effort to enter the domain of operational hyperspectral imaging from Earth orbit. The HySIS satellite carries a hyperspectral imaging sensor. This Earth-observing, imaging spectrometer will operate in the 0.4 to 0.95µm spectral range, will have 55 spectral bands with 10-nanometre spectral sampling and 30-metre spatial sampling.

The satellite is being placed in a 636 km-polar sun synchronous orbit with an inclination of 97.957°, the ISRO website states. HysIS, whose life is five years, weighs about 380 kg.

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Tip for Reading List | Science of remembering, forgetting

New research has decoded the physiological mechanism by which a memory is formed and then subsequently forgotten. The research, which was done in fruit flies, looked at the synaptic changes that occur during learning and forgetting. The investigators found that a single neuron can drive both the learning and forgetting process. The study, done by a team at Scripps Research Institute, was published in the journal Cell Reports.

The flies were conditioned to associate a particular odour with an electric shock. Scientists observed that they subsequently avoided that odour, which confirms that the memory has been made. By monitoring the activity of neurons in the brain before and after the conditioning process, scientists could get an inside look at the physiological underpinnings of memory formation. The researchers also found that when this dopamine neuron is recruited to form a new memory, it also works to degrade older memories. “Whenever you learn something new, you’re simultaneously forming a new memory while potentially interfering with or erasing old ones. It’s a very important balancing act that prevents you from becoming overloaded,” lead author Jacob Berry said in a statement. Although the research was done in fruit flies, the investigators expect that the findings will apply to higher organisms, including humans.

The open-access study can be read at https://www.cell.com/cell-reports/fulltext/S2211-1247(18)31496-7.

Source: Scripps Research Institute