Half of transport firms prefer to hire men, 4 in 5 retail firms hire less than 10% women: Studyhttps://indianexpress.com/article/explained/half-of-transport-firms-prefer-to-hire-men-4-in-5-retail-firms-hire-less-than-10-women-study-5390987/

Half of transport firms prefer to hire men, 4 in 5 retail firms hire less than 10% women: Study

More than a third of the companies said that they prefer to hire men, as compared to just over one-tenth that said that they are looking to hire more women.

World Economic Forum, gender equality in india, gender equality, World Economic Forum study on gender equality, india gender equality, Future of Work in India, india female workforce, india female payscale inequality, india hiring inequality
More than a third of the companies said that they prefer to hire men, as compared to just over one-tenth that said that they are looking to hire more women.

A World Economic Forum report prepared with the Observer Research Foundation (The Indian Express, October 6) has found that companies in India experiencing the highest growth prefer hiring men.

The “Future of Work in India” survey of of 770 companies in textiles, banking & financial services, transport & logistics, and retail, finds that just 2.4% of these have half or more female employees, and as many as 71% have fewer than 10%. Data breaking up this 71% shows that 30% companies have no female employees, and another 32% have less than 5%. Sector-wise, 79% companies in retail, and 77% in transport & logistics, have less than 10% female employees, while banking & finance companies have 61% female participation and textiles 64%.

More than a third of the companies said that they prefer to hire men, as compared to just over one-tenth that said that they are looking to hire more women. The preference for male employees is highest in transport & logistics, at 48%, followed by retail at 44%. In the last five years, the surveyed companies stated that they hired just 26% female workers in the job roles that saw the most growth, which is less than India’s already low female labour force participation of 27%, the report said.

***

This Word Means | Non-refoulement

What is this principal concerning refugees, now in focus with deportation of 7 Rohingya men?

DAYS BEFORE India deported seven Rohingya men to Myanmar last week, a United Nations expert expressed concern at the decision and referred to a principle called “non-refoulement”. “We urge the Government of India to abide by the international norm of non-refoulement and protect the rights of asylum seekers and refugees including Rohingyas,” said E Tendayi Achiume, UN Special Rapporteur on racism (an independent expert appointed by the UN Human Rights Council). The UN defines refoulement as “the expulsion of persons who have the right to be recognised as refugees”. The principle of non-refoulement is set out under the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and its 1967 Protocol (India is not a signatory). The principle is that refugees should not be returned or expelled pending final determination of their status. It is described in Article 33 of the 1951 Convention, also binding on states party to the 1967 Protocol. Article 33(1) states: “No Contracting State shall expel or return (“refouler”) a refugee in any manner whatsoever to the frontiers of territories where his [or her] life or freedom would be threatened on account of his [or her] race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.” —Rahul Tripathi