Food shortage to refugee emergencies — How climate change will reshape the globehttps://indianexpress.com/article/explained/food-shortage-to-refugee-emergencies-how-climate-will-reshape-the-globe-5588610/

Food shortage to refugee emergencies — How climate change will reshape the globe

The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming goes into climate troubles such as food shortages, refugee emergencies, and other crises that will reshape the globe.

Food shortage to refugee emergencies — How climate will reshape the globe
Youth demonstrate for climate change during the “Fridays for Future” school strike, in front of the Ecology Ministry in Paris, France, February 15, 2019. (Reuters Photo: Charles Platiau)

Anxiety about global warming is dominated largely by fears of sea-level rise and extreme weather events.

In a new book, American author and biology professor David George Haskell breaks down the threat into many more aspects, which could make parts of the Earth close to uninhabitable, and other parts horrifically inhospitable, as early as the end of this century.

The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming goes into climate troubles such as food shortages, refugee emergencies, and other crises that will reshape the globe.

Additionally, it predicts, the world will be remade in more profound ways, transforming our politics, our culture, our relationship to technology, and our sense of history; it will be all-encompassing, shaping and distorting nearly every aspect of human life as it is lived today.

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The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming by David George Haskell

As The Guardian notes in its review: “There is much to learn from this book. From media and scientific reports of the past decade, Wallace-Wells sifts key predictions and conveys them in vivid prose… elucidating a dozen categories of anguish including heat death, conflagration, poisoned air and water, psychological trauma, and societal collapse.”

With the impact of international mitigation efforts still uncertain, Wallace-Wells looks at various possibilities— warming of 1.5°C, 2°C or 5°C.

“The ultimate effect of all of this is to feel as if Wallace-Wells is scanning through the entire world with a sort of overactive bionic eye, zooming in on different problems, calculating the risk, and then zooming back out and over to something else,” Slate magazine writes in its review.