Explained Snippets: Raja Mahendra portrait Haryana minister wanted is already in AMU

Actually, AMU does have a photograph of the Raja, in its main library, the Maulana Azad Library, while his father’s name, Raja Ghanshyam of Muraan, is inscribed in a plaque outside a room at Sir Syed Hall (South).

By: Express News Service | Updated: May 15, 2018 1:17:46 am
No minister Abhimanyu, AMU already has a portrait of Raja Mahendra Singh AMU does have a photograph of the Raja, in its main library.

AMID A controversy over Muhammad Ali Jinnah’s portrait at AMU, Haryana’s Finance Minister Captain Abhimanyu said Sunday the university should be renamed after Raja Mahendra Pratap Singh, son of the Jat King of Musran in Aligarh. “What can be sadder than the fact that no image of Raja Mahendra Pratap Singh has been displayed in the university? He donated land for the university without any hesitation with an objective of education to all irrespective of religion, but there is a portrait of Jinnah who divided this country,” Abhimanyu said.

Actually, AMU does have a photograph of the Raja, in its main library, the Maulana Azad Library, while his father’s name, Raja Ghanshyam of Muraan, is inscribed in a plaque outside a room at Sir Syed Hall (South). AMU spokesperson Shafey Kidwai said Raja Mahendra had leased 3.9 acres for a school playground inside AMU, while his father financed the room outside which the plaque with his name is placed. A bulk of the land for the university, around 74 acres, was procured by AMU founder Syed Ahmed Khan from the British government.

An AMU alumnus, Raja Mahendra was a Marxist who tried to start a religion called ‘Prem Dharam’, a social reformer and freedom fighter. In 1957, he was elected to Parliament from Mathura, defeating Atal Bihari Vajpayee. In 1977, two years before his death, the AMU felicitated Mahendra Pratap at its centenary celebrations. (Saba Rahman)

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Telling Numbers

Infant Mortality Rate, the number of deaths per 1,000 live births of children under one year, has come down marginally in Karnataka in the last few years, largely mirroring the all-India trend, but far ahead in the actual ratio. With an IMR of 24 in 2016, however, Karnataka is behind other southern states like Kerala (10) and Tamil Nadu (17). The worst affected regions are the districts in the north.

Karnataka scores better than the all-India average in sex ratio at birth — girls born for every 1,000 boys — but the ratio has fallen at a faster rate than the all-India figures over the years, meaning the proportion of girls being born is falling every year. The latest available ratio (939 in 2013-15) is a steep drop from a peak (958 in 2011-13). (Shalini Nair)

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This Word Means: AHINDA

Why this word, dormant for nearly 40 years, is the key to elections in Karnataka

An acronym for Alpasankyataru (minorities), Hindulidavaru (Backward Classes) and Dalitaru (Dalits), the support of AHINDAs in elections has remained the cornerstone of Chief Minister Siddaramaiah’s politics in Karnataka. He was expelled from the JD(S) in 2005 for organising AHINDA conventions across the state when party chief H D Deve Gowda’s son Kumaraswamy was CM. And it propelled him to power in 2013 with the Congress winning 122 seats. Throughout his tenure, Siddaramaiah has tailored government policies to favour this combination. Numerically, AHINDA voters comprise at least 40% of the electorate. The last CM to win a second consecutive term in Karnataka was Devaraj Urs — who pioneered the consolidation of AHINDA votes — in 1978. Then, Urs, unable to bank on the dominant Vokkaliga or Lingayat communities, who are also OBCs, had created a vote bank with AHINDA to great success.

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Tip for Reading List: ‘No smoking’ is Not Smoke-free

Restrictions on smoking are aimed at protecting non-smokers from second-hand smoke, or smoke inhaled involuntarily from tobacco being smoked by others. Toxins from the air, however, are still finding their way indoors, says a study published in Science Advances. This is in the form of third-hand smoke, the chemical residue from cigarette smoke that attaches to anything and anyone in the vicinity of a smoke cloud. Third-hand smoke can attach itself to aerosol particles, make its way into the air and circulate through buildings where no one is smoking, researchers from Drexel University have found. Third-hand smoke is much more difficult to avoid than second-hand smoke, researcher Michael Waring says on the university website.

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