Explained Snippets | Leisure tourists: India gets a fraction of what SE Asia gets

Only 2.5 million holidaymakers visited India from abroad in 2016. This is far less than in far smaller countries like Thailand, which received 31 million leisure tourists in 2017.

By: Express News Service | Updated: September 13, 2018 11:14:30 am
India has not benefited from the significant growth in numbers of Chinese tourists travelling abroad for leisure, says a new report from aviation consultancy CAPA. (File)

Only 2.5 million holidaymakers visited India from abroad in 2016, a major aviation consultancy firm has estimated based on its analysis of latest available data. This is far less than in far smaller countries like Thailand, which received 31 million leisure tourists in 2017, Malaysia (13.7 million in 2017), Singapore (10.1 million in 2017) and Indonesia (7.6 million in 2016).

India has not benefited from the significant growth in numbers of Chinese tourists travelling abroad for leisure, says a new report from aviation consultancy CAPA. CAPA has clarified that the Indian Tourism Ministry reports data for total foreign tourist arrivals (FTAs), but does not break it down by purpose of travel, hence shutting the possibility of analysing the profile of purely leisure tourists.

“However, the following data, which is for FTAs as a whole does align primary research conducted by CAPA India with industry stakeholders for the organised market, i.e. visitors arranging travel through a tour operator. …There is also an unorganised market, usually comprising younger demographics, that travels independently, booking accommodation and transport directly with suppliers,” says the report.

According to data in the Tourism Ministry’s annual report for 2017-18, there were 8.8 million foreign tourist arrivals in 2016. Provisional data for 2017 (January-November) shows an increase in arrivals to 10.18 million.

Volume of leisure: Foreign tourist arrivals

Thailand (2017) 31 million
Malaysia (2017) 13.7 million
China (2016) 10.5 million
Singapore (2017) 10.1 million
Indonesia (2016) 7.6 million
India (2016) 2.5 million
Sri Lanka (2017) 1.8 million
Maldives (2017) 1.4 million

Data from CAPA India’s Inbound Tourism Report, which attributes it to CAPA India research and analysis, tourism ministry/department of respective countries, and United Nations World Trade Organisation.

This Word Means: Category-4 hurricane

HURRICANE FLORENCE, heading towards the US southeast coast, is expected to be a Category 4 storm, according to the US National Hurricane Center. Category 4, which involves wind speeds of 209-251 km/h, is part of a scale used to classify hurricanes on the basis of wind speed (see chart). Called Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, this is different from the “T scale” used in India to classify cyclonic storms. Hurricanes are essentially tropical cyclones that originate in the Atlantic basin, the eastern North Pacific Ocean and less frequently in the Central North Pacific.

Tip for Reading List: Fascism By a Broad Brush

Yale philosopher Jason Stanley studies language and cognition, and the ways to understand the links between them. His latest work, How Fascism Works: The Politics of Us and Them, mentions in a list of countries that “have been overtaken by a certain kind of far-right nationalism” India, along with Russia, Hungary, Poland, Turkey, and the US. For the purposes of his book, Stanley defines fascism as “ultranationalism of some variety (ethnic, religious, cultural), with the nation represented in the person of an authoritarian leader who speaks on its behalf”.

The book, the author stresses, is about fascist politics — “specifically, fascist tactics as a mechanism to achieve power”. Fascist politics, he says, includes “many distinct strategies: the mythic past, propaganda, anti-intellectualism, unreality, hierarchy, victimhood, law and order, sexual anxiety, appeals to the heartland, and a dismantling of public welfare and unity” — many of these themes are dealt with in separate chapters of the book.

While being a timely refresher on fascism and a useful reminder of its many horrors, the book has been criticised in reviews as being a “lumper” — given to sweeping generalisations that does not adequately acknowledge the differences between “fascist” parties and regimes across the world, indeed, not even those between fascism and conservative or rightwing politics. A review in The New York Times found it troubling that while criticising American conservatives who want universities to teach the Western canon, Stanley was able to equate the motivations of Adolf Hitler with that of the American conservative politician William Bennett, who served under Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H W Bush.

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