Explained snippets: In skilled migration worldwide, busiest route is India to UShttps://indianexpress.com/article/explained/explained-snippets-in-skilled-migration-worldwide-busiest-route-is-india-to-us-5246145/

Explained snippets: In skilled migration worldwide, busiest route is India to US

A newly released World Bank report on global migration shows nearly 12 lakh skilled migrants from India to the US in 2010, compared to nearly 3 lakh from the Philippines to Canada.

A newly released World Bank report on global migration shows nearly 12 lakh skilled migrants from India to the US in 2010.  (AP Photo/Files)

The busiest corridor for international migration is from India to the US, accounting for four times as many migrants as the next busiest, which is from the Philippines to Canada. A newly released World Bank report on global migration shows nearly 12 lakh skilled migrants from India to the US in 2010, compared to nearly 3 lakh from the Philippines to Canada. These figures are based on a definition of skilled migrants as those who have had complete or partial tertiary education. Skilled migrants account for 70-80% of all migrants in each of the 10 busiest corridors, and either the US or Canada is the destination in nine of these 10 corridors.

“Three countries, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States, are the destinations in all of these top corridors,” the report says. The report notes a rapid change in the skill composition of migrant stocks since 1990. In 1990, out of about 40 million migrants living in the OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries, almost half were primary-educated while 27% were tertiary-educated. In 2000, out of 60 million migrants, tertiary-educated migrants had reached almost 20 million, or one-third of the total.

By 2010, the migrant stock was over 85 million, and the number of tertiary-educated was about half (43 million). What has led to the increased share of skilled migrants?

Among the reasons identified in the report, “First, high-skilled migrants can more easily afford the financial costs of migration, earn higher absolute wage gains, and face lower migration policy barriers. Second, the supply of high-skilled migrants has increased rapidly as overall education levels in the world rose quickly during these two decades.”—Promit Chakroborty

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Tip for Reading List: Obama Official’s Memoir of Hope 

Dan Pfeiffer, who served as senior advisor to former US President Barack Obama, decided to write his first book only after Donald Trump won the presidential election. “It wasn’t until Trump won that I thought back to all the things that I dealt with in the White House and that President Obama dealt with — the political forces, the changes in media and technology, the radicalization of the right,” Pfeiffer said in an interview to National Public Radio.

Yes We (Still) Can: Politics in the Age of Obama, Twitter, and Trump is both a look back and a hopeful look forward, as described by Kirkus Reviews. The author reflects not only on his White House experience of working with Obama, but also on an election that the Democrats could have won, but did not. Part-memoir and part-guidebook, it suggests how to create successful campaigns using “five building blocks — attitude, scaling, culture, strategy, and branding”. Pfeiffer has a tip for the Democrats for 2020, writing that they need to be “audacious, authentic and inspirational”.

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This Word Means: Deer in the headlights  

When a deer is caught in the headlights of a vehicle at night, it invariably freezes. This fact is well known to motorists who have encountered deer on highways, and has given rise to the idiom “like a deer in the headlights”. This describes anyone who is a state of paralysed surprise, fear or bewilderment.

On Tuesday, Delhi High Court used the idiom during a hearing in relation to a sting by Cobrapost, when it observed that “when a public official is caught in a sting, he looks like a deer caught in the headlights of a vehicle.”

What makes deer freeze in the headlights? The answer lies in biology. Deer are crepuscular animals, which means they are active during twilight, and their vision is optimised for very low light. When a headlight beam strikes eyes that are fully dilated to capture as much light as possible, deer cannot see at all, and they freeze until the eyes can adjust, The New York Times explains in a 2010 article quoting deer biologist David C Yancy.

The article also cites research that deer are “legally blind” by human standards. It quotes a researcher as estimating a deer’s vision at 20/200 — where a person with normal eyesight can discern an object’s details at 200 yards, deer need to be within 20 yards.