Explained Snippets | 64 MLAs and MPs face kidnapping cases, half of them in 3 states

Over half of them (33), including two Rajya Sabha MPs, were elected from Bihar, Maharashtra and UP.

By: Express News Service | New Delhi | Updated: July 31, 2018 9:17:18 am
The two organisations analysed 4,856 affidavits — filed by 770 MPs and 4,086 MLAs — and found 56 MLAs and8 MPs had declared such cases under IPC sections 359 to 369. (Representational Image)

Sixty-four sitting MLAs and MPs have declared kidnapping/abduction cases against themselves, according to an analysis by the Association of Democratic Reforms and National Election Watch. The two organisations analysed 4,856 affidavits — filed by 770 MPs and 4,086 MLAs — and found 56 MLAs and8 MPs had declared such cases under IPC sections 359 to 369. Over half of them (33), including two Rajya Sabha MPs, were elected from Bihar, Maharashtra and UP.

This Word Means: Fourth Industrial Revolution

The expression ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’ (also ‘Industry 4.0’ and ‘4IR’) entered popular usage in 2016.

Modi has spoken of a new age of technological progress

Speaking in South Africa last week, Prime Minister Narendra Modi said India wanted to “work collectively along with BRICS nations in the area of Fourth Industrial Revolution”.

The expression ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’ (also ‘Industry 4.0’ and ‘4IR’) entered popular usage in 2016. ‘Mastering the Fourth Industrial Revolution’ was the theme of the annual conference of the World Economic Forum in Davos that year, and in a paper titled The Fourth Industrial Revolution: What it Means, How to Respond, WEF founder and executive chairman Klaus Schwab said: “We stand on the brink of a technological revolution that will fundamentally alter the way we live, work, and relate to one another. In its scale, scope, and complexity, the transformation will be unlike anything humankind has experienced before…”

This revolution, Schwab said, was “characterised by a fusion of technologies that (was) blurring the lines between the physical, digital, and biological spheres”. He distinguished it from the First (late 18th-mid 19th centuries in Europe; use of steam power to mechanise production), Second (1870s to 1914; use of electric power to create mass production), and Third (use of electronics and digital tech to automate production from the 1970s onward) Industrial Revolutions, and noted that Industry 4.0 is marked by breakthroughs in artificial intelligence, robotics, Internet of Things, autonomous vehicles, nanotechnology, 3D printing, blockchain, quantum computing, etc.

Tip for Reading List: Why Bring Dead Species To Life?

From the 1818 novel Frankenstein to the 1993 film Jurassic Park, there have been several reminders about the cost of humans playing God. Yet today, scientists are researching on the possible resurrection of extinct or dying species, including the woolly mammoth and the northern white rhino. Unlike Dr Frankenstein who gave his monster life with electricity, or the Jurassic Park scientists who sequenced a dinosaur’s genome from the blood of a prehistoric mosquito, modern scientists are working with gene editing techniques.

What is the point of all this, and is it a good idea? Swedish science journalist Torill Kornfeldt explores that question in The Re-Origin of Species: A Second chance for Extinct Animals (translated by Fiona Graham). Kornfeldt travelled around the world to meet scientists, and found that while some were driven by sheer curiosity, others viewed the lost species as a weapon in the fight to preserve changing ecosystems. She had thought her book would focus on nostalgia for a vanished world, Kornfeldt says; instead, “I discovered that it has more to do with the future, with the present, in which we humans have made ourselves nature’s masters — and with scientists’ unbridled desire to discover the new.”

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