Explained Snippets | Crime against children up 14 per cent in 2 years: steep rise in Assam, Bihar

Replying to a starred question, Minister of State for Home Hansraj Gangaram Ahir cited measures taken such as the recent enhancement of punishment for rape of children aged below 12.

By: Express News Service | New Delhi | Published: August 10, 2018 12:47:41 am
child trafficking, child trafficking cases in india, violence against children, pocso, pocso court, ncrb, child safety, muzaffarpur rape, muzaffarpur shelter home, india news, indian express In Assam, such cases have almost tripled in Assam, from 1,385 to 3,964. Telangana and Bihar too registered a steep rise. In Andhra Pradesh and Delhi, the number of cases has gone down since 2014.

In terms of cases registered, crimes against children — now in public focus amid revelations of sexual abuse in a shelter home in Muzaffarpur — have risen by 14% between 2014 and 2016, the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) reports for these years show. In 2016, the latest year for which figures have been compiled, cases registered under “crimes against children” crossed 1 lakh – 1,06,958 – up from 89,423 in 2014. The government presented these, and other figures, in Lok Sabha this week.

READ | Many states yet to set up POCSO special court in each district

Replying to a starred question, Minister of State for Home Hansraj Gangaram Ahir cited measures taken such as the recent enhancement of punishment for rape of children aged below 12. The data show trends varying from state to state.

In Assam, such cases have almost tripled in Assam, from 1,385 to 3,964. Telangana and Bihar too registered a steep rise. In Andhra Pradesh and Delhi, the number of cases has gone down since 2014. —Raghavi Sharma

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Tip for Reading List: The story of a financial crisis

The introduction to Columbia University professor Adam Tooze’s Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World begins on September 16, 2008, when world leaders gathered in New York for the opening of the UN General Assembly “connected (what became) the (global financial) crisis to the question of global governance and ultimately to America’s position as the dominant world power”. Tooze then moves across space and time — from John McCain’s choice of Sarah Palin as running mate to China’s sporting successes, from Russian bullying of Georgia to Donald Trump’s declaration of his “decree” putting “America First”, and asks: “What is the relationship of the economic crisis of 2008 to the geopolitical disaster of 2003 [when President George W Bush invaded Iraq] and to America’s political crisis following the election of November 2016?… How does it relate to the minor but no less shattering trajectory traced by the United Kingdom from Iraq to the crisis of the City of London in 2008 and Brexit in 2016?” It is to the answering of these questions that “this bravura work of economic history”, as The New York Times review described it, is devoted.

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This Word Means: POSTHOSPITAL SYNDROME

Why more & more older patients returning to hospital

Over the past few years, hospitals in the West have been reporting a spike in readmissions among older patients. In 2016, some 18% of discharged Medicare beneficiaries in the US had gone back to hospital within a month, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). It is widely recognised that after discharge, older patients especially go through a period of general vulnerability that could return them to hospital. This period has been described as “posthospital syndrome” (PHS), now a subject of significant data-based research. The expression first appeared in a 2013 paper by Harlan Krumholz, a cardiologist at the Yale School of Medicine. After Medicare — the US national health programme for individuals age 65 or more — started to penalise hospitals for readmissions within 30 days under President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act, Dr Krumholz studied national data and reported that nearly a fifth of Medicare patients discharged needed another hospitalisation within 30 days, and these patients reported conditions, many of which had little in common with the initial diagnosis. Dr Krumholz has argued that discharge after being treated for a certain condition marks the beginning of a 60- to 90-day period of increased vulnerability to other health problems, stemming from the stress of hospitalisation itself.

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