Telling Numbers — 9,78,000 #MeToo tweets in India in October exceed US monthly highhttps://indianexpress.com/article/explained/978000-metoo-tweets-in-india-in-october-exceed-us-monthly-high-5418905/

Telling Numbers — 9,78,000 #MeToo tweets in India in October exceed US monthly high

Twitter saw more #MeToo tweets from India in the month ending October 19 than any single month in the US over the past year.

Telling Numbers — 9,78,000 #MeToo tweets in India in October exceed US monthly high
The first #MeToo tweet in India was on October 16, 2017.

Twitter saw more #MeToo tweets from India in the month ending October 19 than any single month in the US over the past year — this was the headline finding in Twitter data released this week on the movement of Indian women against sexual misconduct and sexual harassment by men in a range of professional and personal situations.

1.3 million #MeToo tweets from India during the past year

1.2 million tweets in India from September 20-October 19 with hashtags #metoo,#MeTooIndia,#WeTheWomen, #TimesUp, #MeTooMovement, #TanushreeDutta

88,728 tweets: highest #MeToo activity in a month in India before this (October 2017)

97,000 tweets: monthly #MeToo average over the past year; before this past month, it averaged only 23,500

5,70,000 tweets: monthly #MeToo average by US users in the past year

10,000 retweets — the most — for Rahul Gandhi’s #MeToo tweet: “It’s about time everyone learns to treat women with respect and dignity. I’m glad the space for those who don’t, is closing. The truth needs to be told loud and clear in order to bring about change. #MeToo”

54,000 retweets: top global #MeToo related tweet, by journalist Alexis Benveniste: “Reminder that if a woman didn’t post #MeToo, it doesn’t mean she wasn’t sexually assaulted or harassed. Survivors don’t owe you their story.”

September 8-9: When the #MeToo conversation peaked around the world on Twitter, following the resignation of Les Moonves, chairman and CEO of CBS, following allegations of sexual harassment and assault

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Other peaks: October 15-16, 2017 (when hashtag began taking off), March 8 (International Women’s Day), December 6 (resignation of US Senator Al Franken following accusations of sexual misconduct), January 7 (Golden Globes, where Harvey Weinstein was booed)

October 16, 2017: first #MeToo tweet in India

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Explained Snippets | Tip for Reading List: Six existing subspecies of tigers, three extinct, genetic study confirms

So far, scientists had been uncertain whether there are six, five or only two subspecies of tigers. Now, a team of researchers has confirmed that tigers fall into six genetically distinct groups. Their findings, based on an analysis of the complete genomes of 32 representative tiger specimens, were reported in the journal Current Biology Thursday.

The six subspecies are Bengal tiger, Amur tiger, South China tiger, Sumatran tiger, Indochinese tiger, and Malayan tiger. Three other tiger subspecies are extinct — Caspian tiger, Javan tiger, and Bali tigers. Habitat loss and poaching continue to threaten the survival of tigers, of which just 4,000 specimens remain in the wild.

Shu-Jin Luo of Peking University, Beijing, and his colleagues, including lead author Yue-Chen Liu, used a whole-genome approach to expand their earlier genetic evidence on the tiger’s evolutionary history and population structure. Although tigers trace their history back to two to three million years, the current population comes from a common ancestor about 110,000 years ago. The study found very little evidence of breeding between one tiger subspecies and another, which indicates that each subspecies has a unique evolutionary history.

The subspecies have distinct features. For example, Amur tigers are large with pale orange fur, while Sumatran tigers in the Sunda Islands tend to be smaller with darker, thickly striped fur. The origin of the South China tiger remains unresolved since only one specimen from captivity was used in this study; this subspecies has gone extinct in the wild. The researchers plan to study old specimens with known origin from all over China to fill in the missing pieces of living tigers’ evolutionary history.

“Tigers are not all alike,” the news agency AFP quoted Luo as saying. “Tigers from Russia are evolutionarily distinct from those from India. Even tigers from Malaysia and Indonesia are different.”

For the full study, visit: https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(18)31214-4

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