Little Things Season 3 review: A little too muchhttps://indianexpress.com/article/entertainment/web-series/little-things-season-3-review-netflix-6110310/

Little Things Season 3 review: A little too much

Little Things Season 3 review: The intention of Little Things is pure and in the right place, but what's the point if you are unable to execute them? A little bit of heart could have gone a long way. Little Things has become something big and boring.

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Little Things Season 3 review
Little Things Season 3 review: What this season needed was a tight screenplay and better dialogues.

Little Things Season 3 cast: Mithila Palkar and Dhruv Sehgal
Little Things Season 3 creator: Dhruv Sehgal
Little Things Season 3 rating: Two stars

A young couple in Mumbai, navigating fledgling careers, a live-in relationship and debating/fighting at night whether to eat sandwiches for dinner or Maggi. That was the premise of Little Things, which a couple of years ago showcased its first season. By season 2, Netflix came on board, and well things changed. Now we have season three on our hands, and we are still not sure if Netlfix’s arrival was a good thing for the independent show.

Season two had ended with Dhruv (Dhruv Sehgal) and Kavya (Mithila Palkar) having the trademark soul-baring conversation, which we also saw in season one. “Because I take us for granted”, admits Kavya. Anyways. The third season plunges us straight into Bangalore, where Dhruv has taken up a research position. “So, long distance”, they both ask each other.

We see Dhruv trying to settle in this new academic world, and Kavya trying to adjust to a life without him. Missed phone calls, unanswered texts, and new Instagram posts — that’s the new dynamics for the two. But slowly they both settle in, and eventually, a new rhythm of life is formed. Kavya makes new friends, and Dhruv too gets in sync with a laid back idyllic campus, and focuses on his research. Just six months, they said. But those six moths helps in the development arc of the lead characters than the previous two seasons put together.

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The charm of Little Things, which they established very well in the first season, was that how modern-day romance is not about the big gestures but is actually about keeping calm in the face of daily shenanigans. That how sleeping in for ten minutes will make you late for work, get you screamed at by your boss, and starting a whole chain of unfortunate events, and yes the person who will bear the brunt of all this will be your partner. By season 2, with a big investor, the scale of the show got bigger, the house got bigger and so did the supporting cast. So did the issues of the said relationship. Season 3 takes it to another level. It seems for the first time that the two are interacting with the world at large. We meet the families for the first time, and through them, we see another side of Dhruv and Kavya. Little Things comes at an interesting time, where everyone in the country is talking about the youth, but no-one is talking to them. We haven’t had this story. We had a Permanent Roomates on similar lines, but that was more goofy fun stuff.

The show — though very much set in the millennial, urban, English speaking landscape of privilege — takes up pertinent issues that plague the young and their relationships today. We see friends drifting apart, disconnecting with their families, and borderline midlife crisis etc etc. Concept is not the problem for Little Things, it’s the execution. Season one was a refreshing, innocent and interesting take on things that we see around us. Season two, evolved, but season three is too heavy. Dhruv Sehgal, the developer of the series and also the writer of season one and two, wants to address many things – angst about careers, societal issues, family etc — but sadly they don’t land. What this season needed was a tight screenplay and better dialogues. “Kaise baat Kar rah yaar” in a fight works when you are fighting over ice cream, not when you are discussing a life-altering move.

For a show centred around a live-in couple, we see the lead pair burdened by the world they live in, with little or no time for romance. But maybe that’s what happens when you have been with someone for too long. The intentions of Little Things are pure and in the right place, but what’s the point if you are unable to execute them? A little bit of heart could have gone a long way. Little Things has become something big and boring.