Rarandoi Veduka Chudham movie review: This Naga Chaitanya film is no spectacle

Rarandoi Veduka Chudham movie review: Director Kalyan Krishna Kurasala has developed a forgettable family drama on a premise that is as old as the Telugu film industry itself.

Rating: 2 out of 5
Written by Manoj Kumar R | Bengaluru | Updated: July 11, 2017 3:55:02 pm
Rarandoi Veduka Chudham movie review

Rarandoi Veduka Chudham movie castNaga Chaitanya, Rakul Preet Singh
Rarandoi Veduka Chudham director: Kalyan Krishna
Rarandoi Veduka Chudham movie rating: 2 stars

Naga Chaitanya is going through a rough patch in his career. Even acting in the remake of the blockbuster film like Premam did not fetch the desired results for the actor. While his Sahasam Swasaga Saagipo failed to live up to the expectations, the Tamil version, Achcham Yenbadhu Madamaiyada, with Simbu in the lead role, went on to become the box-office hit in Tamil Nadu. A hit film is the need of the hour for Chaitanya’s acting career. And Rarandoi Veduka Chudham (Come, Let’s Watch the Spectacle) may not be the film that is likely to give the much-needed break to the actor.

The makers of the latest family entertainer have played it very carefully to deliver a crowd-pleasing film. But as the saying goes, “the policy of being too cautious is the greatest risk of all.” The film suffers from the same reason. Director Kalyan Krishna has developed a forgettable family drama on a premise that is as old as the Telugu film industry itself.

Bhramarambha (Rakul Preet Singh) is the favourite daughter in a picture-perfect joint family that showers its unconditional love on her. The girl meets the boy, Shiva (Naga Chaitanya) at a friend’s wedding. She doesn’t fall in love with him. But, it is love at the first sight for the hero. The audience is later treated to a bunch of forcefully injected antics by supporting actors that would never happen at a real wedding. And there’s a customary celebration song, Rarandoi Veduka Chudham, that actually helps to lift up the mood in the theatre.

Shiva begins to engage in various antics in order to grab the attention of Bhramarambha with disastrous results. She is spoiled by all the love and affection of her family. When the time comes for her to leave her hometown and go to Vizag for her higher studies, she is terrified. And she seeks out Shiva to help her through her times away from her family. Shiva sees his window of opportunity and tries his best to impress her and make her fall in love with him. But, the problem is he has been friendzoned by her. The rest of the film is all about how does he escape from there and win her over.

Shiva is a happy-go-lucky guy but lacks a personality. He is the only son of a millionaire businessman Krishna (Jagapathi Babu) with the nerve of steel and heart of gold. He won’t keep quiet at a place where there is injustice or a damsel in the distress. The director has clearly tried every hard to make this character likeable but I’m afraid he has not succeeded in doing so. Shiva’s character is sort of unrealistically. Although he dresses trendy, his character feels like he is from the 1980s. Shiva has no discernible talents and qualities that strike a chord with the audience. He is just one among the stock characters that sets unrealistic and outdated hero goals for the youngsters. Meanwhile, Chaitanya seems to have a problem in pulling off a role of a popular boy of the crowd.

On the other hand, Bhramarambha is instantly likeable. She is charming, funny and self-obsessed. She has a lot of flaws but is unapologetic about them and lives life to the fullest without worrying about what other people think of her. Rakul is at ease in this role and delivers a charming performance.

Jagapathi Babu’s character has a very little contribution to make to the film’s narration. And the senior actor seems to have resigned to his fate of a being just a filler in movies. The film has a huge star cast, including actors like Sampath Raj, Kausalya, Vennela Kishore and Posani Krishna Murali among others. But, the director has not made a good use of their talents due to a weak script.

Music from Devi Sri Prasad is one of the very few good things about this film. With growing opportunities for the audience to consume more and more interesting films from across the world via new media, they are very unlikely to appreciate the filmmakers’ attempt to serve old wine in the new bottle. The filmmakers must try and evolve or risk becoming obsolete.

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