Roar: Tigers of the Sunderbans / Roar’s music fails to roarhttps://indianexpress.com/article/entertainment/screen/roar-tigers-of-the-sunderbans-roars-music-fails-to-roar/

Roar: Tigers of the Sunderbans / Roar’s music fails to roar

For a film that centers around an incident in the Sunderbans and depicts the plight of the tigers that are becoming an extinct species, it was imperative to have music that brings forth the essence of the film.

Roar: Tigers of the Sunderbans
Roar: Tigers of the Sunderbans

By Kanika Rajani

For a film that centers around an incident in the Sunderbans and depicts the plight of the tigers that are becoming an extinct species, it was imperative to have music that brings forth the essence of the film.
Since Roar: Tigers of the Sunderbans is more about the issue, the team behind the film has kept the number of songs limited to three unlike many other movies which are brimming with multiple tracks. With an aim to give viewers a sense of being in the jungle, the team has roped in VJ Ramona Arena of MTV fame and an European orchestra for the film’s background score. While John Stewart has worked on the film’s background score besides composing the track Rubaru, Arena has composed two songs — Zara jeene de and Khatra.
Zara jeene de is a duet by Ramona Arena and Aditya Trivedi and is being touted to be the country’s tiger anthem. The song seems apt considering it’s told from a tiger’s perspective. However, it lacks the punch and one can barely feel the pain of the tigers after listening to the song.
Rubaru by Aditi Singh in comparison is simpler and thus better. The lyrics of the song, Bin bulaaye aaya hai, tu anchaaha mehmaan… na kismat pe bharosha kar ye..fitrat se beimaan hai..rightly echo the ruthlessness of the human species.
Khatra, again, a song from the tiger’s perspective, sung by Neeti Mohan and Bonnie Chakraborty, fails to impress like Zara jeene de. The song tries to warn one about the wrath of the tiger when he’s threatened, but the motive of the song is hardly fulfilled as with electro beats, it comes across more like party anthem than an effective background score.
For a wildlife thriller, Roar‘s music is disappointing.