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On the Prowl

Canada based Nora Fatehi, who makes her debut in Kamal Sadanah’s upcoming film, Roar, talks to Screen about playing an adrenaline junkie and why she loves entertaining people

Written by Priya Adivarekar | Mumbai |
Updated: September 19, 2014 1:00:17 am
Nora Fatehi Nora Fatehi

Launch vehicle

In Roar, I play the character C.J. (Crazy Jenny). Jenny is an adrenaline junky, who is always ready to fight with unknown armed poachers, while replicating various movements of a dance. She is frank, bold and likes to look at things as black and white. She is just like one of the boys with a distinctive style and personality, which people generally tend to misinterpret.

Casting coup

I came to Mumbai just four months before I decided to pursue films. I gave several auditions and that’s when I was told that Kamal Sadanah was casting for his upcoming venture. I decided to meet him and was then asked to audition for this role. I was given the scenes and had three days to prepare. As soon as I auditioned, both the director and producer were keen to have me on board. It all happened so quickly that within a week’s time, I was called in to sign the contract. It was surreal, but since the film had an entirely new team, I was not sure if I should be happy or skeptical. But as soon as we began our workshops and action training, things began to fall in place pretty well. Finally, we left for the Sundarbans to shoot and that’s when I knew that I have done the right thing by opting for this project.

Stepping stone

I was born and brought up in Canada. Entertaining people was something that I wanted to do all my life. Since childhood, I have been attracted to performing arts. I love being the centre of attention and would confidently perform even in front of a huge audience. But at the same time, I was extremely studious and would always score top marks. Ever since I turned 10, I knew that I wanted to be under the spotlight, but it wasn’t easy. Post high school, I enrolled at a university for some time, but I was not happy. So, I followed my dreams and joined a talent agency in Toronto, which sent me to India and things worked in my favour.

First shot

On the first day, I had to face the camera for a solo shot where I had to run in the jungles. Kamal asked me to run continuously through the silt filled terrain at top speed. The entire shot was physically challenging, but I was not nervous at all as I had mentally prepared myself to ace the shot. I kept running non-stop for 20 minutes and the director loved my determination. Post this, I got an adrenaline rush every time I did something adventurous.

Stumbling blocks

Nothing at all! I starting shooting with a clear mind set that I am going to give more than my best and I was going to make sure that I cross every hurdle.

The takeaway

I have learned so much during the making of Roar. I made sure that apart from the shoot, I am also around during the post production, visual effects, recording session, and background score work as well. I wanted to see and learn how everything is done. Learning never stops and enhancing your knowledge on the job is the best thing ever.

Role model

Well, no one in particular, because I look up to different people as a source of inspiration. People who suffer hardships, make an impossible task possible or break all barriers for what they believe in are the ones who continue to inspire me.

Future projects
After Roar, I have started working on Prakash jha’s production venture (directed Ritesh Menon). I play one of the leads in this yet untitled film that is scheduled to release in January 2015.

priya.adivarekar@expressindia.com

 

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