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Music Review: Finding Fanny

Amid a clutter of similar sounds being churned out in Bollywood, the soundtrack of 'Finding Fanny' is more than just a breath of fresh air.

Rating: 3 out of 5
Written by Suanshu Khurana |
Updated: September 12, 2014 10:54:47 am
findingfanny-music Amid a clutter of similar sounds being churned out in Bollywood, the soundtrack of Homi Adajania’s ‘Finding Fanny’ by French musician Mathias Duplessy, is more than just a breath of fresh air.

Music Review: Finding Fanny
Composers: Mathias Duplessy, Sachin-Jigar
Lyricists: Sachin-Jigar, Alan Mercer and Dinoo
Rating: ***

Amid a clutter of similar sounds being churned out in Bollywood, the soundtrack of Homi Adajania’s ‘Finding Fanny‘ by French musician Mathias Duplessy, is more than just a breath of fresh air. It satisfies the need listeners didn’t even know they had — the one looking for a crevice of different but the core of which is what they have known all their life. What works in the first 30 seconds of the soundtrack is the eclectic mix of classic and quirky. With that there is something endearing about the arrangements that have a feel-good  quality to them.

The bouncy flamenco-tinged title song Fanny re traces a direct bloodline to Woody Allens Vicky Cristina Barcelona. The Spanish guitar that comes with an odd flourish, sets the mood for a modern number. The twangs pluck at the heart strings, but as the accordion and banjo join in along with singer Mukhtiyar Ali’s voice, the song just comes alive. What’s surprising is that Ali is singing a Punjabi number set to these arrangements. After a long time we’ve heard a Punjabi number (with the exception of Ambarsariya in Fukrey) that does not use the quintessential tumbi and dhol. And somehow it all makes sense. This is followed by Maahi ve, which is a replica of Fanny re, the exception being that the former is a little more extemporising. Ali goes a little off key here, one can even hear his voice crackle, but the rawness of it all works well.

Then comes Ding dong, an English track for which Duplessy goes behind the microphone with a mandolin and guitar leading the way. The chord changes work well and the character is very Portuguese. It’s nice, but does not stay. Then there is Shake your bootiya by Sachin-Jigar, which begins with a strange haunting scream and cough. The song tries to include some ambient sounds and goes Hai re meri fanniya badi witty witty hai. A fun track put out by Sachin-Jigar.

All in all, Fanny re is the only song that seems to stick. Rest of the tracks scream artistic renewal and are even intelligently crafted but that does not necessarily result in memorable songs. It needed more songs, while some existing songs required more work. But overall there is a zing to this album.

Suanshu Khurana

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