‘Badlapur’ Music Review: The Right Groovehttps://indianexpress.com/article/entertainment/play/badlapur-music-review-the-right-groove/

‘Badlapur’ Music Review: The Right Groove

The album falters in terms of lyrics. However, this is Sachin-Jigar’s most succinct work.

varun dhawan, badlapur
Varun Dhawan in a still from the gritty Badlapur.

Composers: Sachin-Jigar
Lyrics: Priya Saraiya, Dinesh Vijan

From producing an excellent Saibo (Shor in the City) and a quirky Shake your bootiya (Finding Fanny) to a series of songs that were an absolute loss of the concept of melody to say the least, Sachin-Jigar seem to have got their groove back with Badlapur. The album, which borrows from classical music (every song has some or the other element) and adds a modern touch to it, sounds like it is pushing the boundaries. It is the album’s wide melodic vocabulary and a full sound that seems to work for the most part of it. The somewhat classical tones albeit mishmashed with grunge riffs are what give Badlapur an edge.

Jee karda, the centerpiece of the album opens with a giant guitar riff that layers itself into fine interludes during the song. The Punjabi/ Hindi number’s appeal lies in turning the typical Punjabi sound on its head and using more grunge elements to turn it into one headbanger of a song. A lot of credit goes to Divya Kumar’s voice here, who might just be ready to take the mantle from Arijit Singh. The composers also sneak in a gorgeous shehnai interlude by Rehmad Zaidi in the track, which gives it a strange hearth and home feeling. Midway, the track becomes slow, and to our happiness the transition sounds masterful.

[related-post]

This is followed by the remix of the same track. It’s after a while that we’ve heard an album where a song’s remix version works equally well. We absolutely loved the idea of using harmonium chords as a second voice. Absolute rampage.

Advertising

Badla badla in Vishal Dadlani’s trademark tones has been arranged with a mix of synthesizers and beat machines. Some brilliant riffs works quite well here. Then there is Atif Aslam’s Jeena, which is getting much airtime on radio these days. The choice of a nasal and somewhat granulated voice of Aatif may not be perfect for a song that could have been sung better by Arijit Singh. But the composition is soft, cascading and has intelligent arrangements. The flute sings along softly. It is the song’s reprise version, which is disappointing. Give it a miss and your iPod will feel happier.

Sachin-Jigar have managed to do one more thing. They have broken the monotony of Rekha Bharadwaj’s folksy voice by giving her a song where she has to stick to bass notes and not go beyond mandra saptak (bass scale). It’s a restriction that seems to have worked and can take her fans by surprise. A take on Kabir’s Chadariya jhini re jhini, Judaai is packaged with Singh’s voice, who is his usual self.

The album falters in terms of lyrics. However, this is Sachin-Jigar’s most succinct work.