Airlift music review: Overall, the album is marred with quite a bit of musical conservatism

Airlift music review: Overall, the album is marred with quite a bit of musical conservatism, and the lyricist and composers haven’t gone beyond the tried and tested.

Rating: 2 out of 5
Written by Suanshu Khurana | Updated: January 22, 2016 9:53:09 am

 airlift, soch na sake, arijit singh, akshay kumar, nimrat kaur, music review The tunes of Akshay Kumar and Nimrat Kaur starrer Airlift has been able to woo many hearts.

Amid an onslaught of generic songcraft that’s thrown at us from various sides, another a slightly-above-average album comes to the fore. The tunes of Akshay Kumar and Nimrat Kaur starrer Airlift, which are getting much airtime these days with syrupy strings in tow, are just about alright. That said, the album does deliver the average with much panache and refrains from any kind of din.
Soch na sake by Arijit Singh is a soft romantic melody with acceptable levels of saccherine. The guitar interlude paired with a tabla, which gives the piece pace for a while and stops in a few seconds to come back easy breezy pace, is one of the more interesting bits in the song. The second interlude is on the piano. Only jarring note in this song is Tulsi Kumar’s oddly thin, child-like voice, which turns a decent melody into a sugar festival. Singh’s solo version is much better. The song, however, has been adapted from B Praak and Hardy Sandhu’s Punjabi song, Soch. A rabab prelude seagues into shehnai made to sound Middle-eastern for Dil cheez tujhe dedi and plagiarises heavily from famous pop of the ’90s — Didi by Khaled. The song, however, does have a catchy hook and is likely to be a club favourite in the days to come.
Mera nachan nu is an average Punjabi composition, kept afloat only because of Divya Kumar’s brilliant vocals. One spots fascinating levels of sincerity in Tu bhoola jise sung by KK. An anthemic yet ordinary piece, it opens with a mix of trumpets, guitars and some drums, followed by KK’s voice with just a guitar. The song later layers Indian national song Vande Matram with the song, which sounds like an interesting idea on paper, but the execution is nothing to write home about.

Overall, the album is marred with quite a bit of musical conservatism, and the lyricist and composers haven’t gone beyond the tried and tested, resulting in tunes that are pleasing sometimes but ones that certainly don’t linger.

Composers: Amaal Mallik & Ankit Tiwari
Lyrics: Kumaar

For all the latest Entertainment News, download Indian Express App

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement