India is listening to Dilli Waali Baatcheet by Raftaarhttps://indianexpress.com/article/entertainment/music/india-is-listening-to-dilli-waali-baatcheet-by-raftaar-5930851/

India is listening to Dilli Waali Baatcheet by Raftaar

Raftaar's Dilli Waali Baatcheet may not be an ode to Delhi or its cultures, but stays true to the world he became relevant in.

‘India is listening to’ is a look at what music is wildly popular in the country at the moment, and whether it’s worth your time.

For as long as Hip-Hop has existed, representing where you’re from and where you are is incredibly important. Raftaar’s “Dilli Waali Baatcheet” tries to do just that in the most grand, larger than life way possible.

The song is an ode to hanging out with your bros, living well, and finally making it big in what you love doing (all the while staying true to where you’re from). Raftaar’s growling flow paints a picture of how living in the city has been important to him and how it’s different now that he’s successful doing what he does. It features the usual tropes of shrugging off the haters and endorsing a life full of fast cars.

The song chugs along for three minutes and is incredibly cohesive. It sticks to a traditional short song structure and doesn’t gamble with a too-creative or different-sounding bridge section. While there is an extended outro where the drums get slower, nothing else changes.  On the whole, the beat is good, but plays it a little safe.

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“Dilli Waali Baatcheet”, more than an ode to the city or its cultures, is a testament to the world Raftaar has grown up and become relevant in. It speaks of communities he holds close to him as well as the hardships he and his family have had to deal with. These might seem like soft themes but Raftaar’s delivery and wordplay ensure that that softness is draped in layers of bravado.

Who will love it: Bros from Delhi, fans of a low, growling flow.

The Good: The beat is an interesting take on bass-heavy hip-hop.

The Bad: The song plays it a little safe with its musical choices.

The Verdict: It may not be an ode to Delhi, but it is definitely worth a listen.