Dear Zindagi music review: Sounds of Life

The album opens with the title song in Jasleen Royal’s voice with Amit Trivedi and the chorus giving her voice strong support.

Written by Suanshu Khurana | Updated: November 19, 2016 12:04:03 am

dear zindagi, alia bhatt, shah rukh khan, gauri shinde, dear zindagi story, dear zindagi release, dear zindagi music, amit trivedi, kausar munir, jasleen royal, music, music review, indian express talk, entertainment The result is a fresh and enthusiastic set, with life’s tales told in a breezy fashion. It’s mischievous and at times too simple, but has enough to ensure it does not fall into monotonous or frivolous boxes.

Composer: Amit Trivedi
Lyrics: Kausar Munir

One of the more distinctive qualities of composer Amit Trivedi is his ability to catch the musical brief of a filmmaker by its nose, and in that find his own evolutionary twist. For Gauri Shinde’s Dear Zindagi — the Alia Bhatt and Shah Rukh Khan starrer — he’s found a perfect collaborator in lyricist Kausar Munir, whose refreshing and colloquial lyrics are thoughtful and simple redrafts of life heard in Hindustani. The result is a fresh and enthusiastic set, with life’s tales told in a breezy fashion. It’s mischievous and at times too simple, but has enough to ensure it does not fall into monotonous or frivolous boxes.

The album opens with the title song in Jasleen Royal’s voice with Amit Trivedi and the chorus giving her voice strong support. The prelude has flutes and light touch of xylophones. Royal’s innocent voice singing Munir’s lyrics, which have the ability to connect with everybody, is paired with a casually echoing acoustic guitar and drums alongside. Jo dil se lage use keh do hi hi, Jo dil na lage use keh do bye bye, she sings and gives your heart a little nudge. A guitar prelude, specks of which continue throughout the song, opens Tu hi hai. Arijit Singh takes a U-turn from his usual emphatic routines to attempt this fun, graceful number. It’s a dazzling performance that has been intelligently crafted by Trivedi.

One of the best pieces in the album is Taareefon se. Another Arijit number, it uses a trumpet in a soft guitar piece. The horn offers some lengthy stretches that make the song shine. Trivedi’s obsession with brass instruments that was showcased beautifully in Bombay Velvet continues here, albeit in a non-jazz fashion. Let’s break up in Vishal Dadlani’s voice comes from the days of luminous guitar solos in the ’70s and ’80s. The orchestration, lifted by electric guitars, is better than the song itself. A violin opens the sad song of the film — Just go to hell dil — and continues along most of the piece. Sunidhi Chauhan begins in a low voice, then brazenly submits to the sadness of the song to deliver a fine piece.

Trivedi takes the classic Aye zindagi from Sadma and has Arijit sing it. What’s appealing is the orchestration, which is a complete turnaround from the original. The song uses piano, electric guitars and drums and yet maintains the soul of the original. Bhatt sings a heavily electronic version of the same. She sticks to lower scales and the massively auto-tuned piece, which lets go of the song’s richness, has her going completely off key in parts.

The album lacks variance, yet, with intricate experimentation, it manages to have many sparkling moments. Avoid Bhatt’s piece.

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