Take It Easy movie review: Loud background music, loud melodrama and loud dialogues

Joy Sengupta is one of those dads who is never satisfied. His son comes second in class and in a race, and his world comes crashing down.

Rating: 1.5 out of 5
Written by Shubhra Gupta | New Delhi | Published: January 2, 2015 3:52:42 pm

Take it Easy Relentless parental pressure is a terrible thing. ‘Take It Easy’ takes this truism very seriously indeed and rams it home in each frame.

Take It Easy movie review: Loud background music, loud melodrama and loud dialogues
Cast: Joy Sengupta, Raj Zutshi, Anang Desai, Dipannita Sharma, Sulbha Arya, Supriya Karnik, Vikram Gokhale
Director: Sunil Prem Vyas

Relentless parental pressure is a terrible thing. ‘Take It Easy’ takes this truism very seriously indeed and rams it home in each frame, with no acknowledgement that it has been done before.

It is a lesson worth repeating, especially in India where Tiger Moms and Dads make their kids’ lives miserable with their constant litany of “study, so you can go to IIT /medical school/ IIM, and conquer the world”.

But the way ‘Take It Easy’ does it makes you sigh. When will filmmakers learn to tell a story with nuance and subtlety, and with some freshness? Those are the only things that can rescue a film with an old, familiar theme. Remember Rajkumar Hirani’s ‘3 Idiots’, which took messaging to another level ?

Joy Sengupta is one of those dads who is never satisfied. His son comes second in class and in a race, and his ( the father’s) world comes crashing down. Raj Zutshi plays a bitter athlete whose career was cut short by an injury : all he wants from his boy is for him to become a world class runner and go win at the Olympics.

These two boys are surrounded by loving grandmas and wise grandpas ( Arya and Desai) respectively, who only look resigned when the dads thunder and beat the boys ( yes, no one’s heard that one about spare the rod etc), and give lectures.

Suddenly, the film remembers to take in class divide, and gives us a hard-hearted school principal ( Karnik) who curls her lip and talks about ‘these middle-class people who can’t afford high fees’. Suddenly a Kendriya Vidyalaya is mentioned, just to tell us that the film knows and cares about ‘government schools’, not just pricey private ones.

Both Sengupta and Zutshi are given so few reflective moments that it is a pity : these are actors who can do it, when given a chance. With some easy moments, this film could have been easier to watch, but not when there is no break from loud background music, loud melodrama, and loud dialogues. Even the children, who all try hard to be as natural as possible, are weighed down under all the preachiness.

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