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Mechanic: Resurrection movie review: Jason Statham returns as the hitman but fails to keep track with its prequel

Mechanic: Resurrection movie review: Jason Statham tries hard to stay upbeat with his adrenaline rushing avatar. But somewhere in the middle he gets trapped in bad script and forced action.

Rating: 0.5 out of 5
Written by Shalini Langer | New Delhi | Published: August 26, 2016 5:31:10 pm
Mechanic resurrection movie review, Mechanic resurrection review, Mechanic resurrection star rating, Jason Statham, Jessica Elba, the Mechanic sequel, Tommy Lee Jones, Jason Statham film Mechanic: Resurrection movie review: Jason Statham film is The Mechanic’s sequel.

Mechanic: Resurrection movie cast: Jason Statham, Jessica Elba, Tommy Lee Jones
Mechanic: Resurrection movie director: Dennis Gansel

An African warlord who eats his rivals’ hearts, an Australian mines magnate who once trafficked children, and an American arms dealer who now deals in Inter Continental Ballistic Missiles. Arthur Bishop (Statham) has a lot more on his plate this time than the 2011 prequel. And then there is the real dish: Gina (Alba). She is a former American “Special Military Operative” once posted in Afghanistan, who now runs a shelter for trafficking victims in Cambodia. She falls for Bishop over two lingering glances and several states of undress, and then spends her role waiting for him to rescue her.

Bishop, a trained assassin who went into hiding after putting up an act of being dead last time, is hauled back into business by former friend-turned enemy Craine. As Craine tells Bishop, patiently, there are many ways to track people down these days, such as “facial recognition” tech and “satellite tracking”. This to a man who wields a vernier calliper to plan the breach of a jail. Later, Bishop also mixes two chemicals in test-tubes to cause the glass base of a swimming pool to crack (the film’s most impressive shot).

Craine wants Bishop to make three kills or Gina dies. Three becomes somewhere closer to 300, and Gina never puts her American military training to any use.

Michelle Yeoh is a gypsy-esque woman running a hotel on a Thai coast wielding “Eastern Medicine” and uniting souls such as Gina and Bishop by tying them together at a dance.

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Lee Jones strolls in towards the end, in red glasses, striped pajamas and fluffy flipflops, for a vague disposition on Communism, and “small people firing slingshots”.

By then, action has moved overnight, on a boat that Craine never gets off, from Indian Ocean to Black Sea. Precisely, 8,664 nautical miles separate the Bulgarian and Australian coasts.

Precisely.

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