Maze Runner The Death Cure movie review: This Dylan O’Brien starrer fails to impress

Maze Runner: The Death Cure movie review: Thomas (Dylan O'Brien) and his friends plunge here right into the mess with the word go, without making any concessions for those who may have come two movies too late into this franchise.

Rating: 2 out of 5
Written by Shalini Langer | New Delhi | Published: February 2, 2018 6:34:49 pm
Maze Runner The Death Cure movie review Maze Runner: The Death Cure plugs a parable on walls, and leaders who hope to keep out the great unwashed with them. This swipe at Donald Trump is more serious than in other films of such genre.

Maze Runner: The Death Cure movie cast: Dylan O’Brien, Thomas Brodie-Sangster, Kaya Scodelario, Rosa Salazar, Will Poulter, Ki Hong Lee, Patricia Clarkson
Maze Runner: The Death Cure movie director: Wes Ball
Maze Runner: The Death Cure movie rating: 2 stars

What began as an interesting adaptation of yet another dystopian young-adult fiction, through a very Lord-of-the-Flies invocation, descended long back into a series of senseless violent encounters. And Thomas (O’Brien) and his friends plunge here right into the mess with the word go, without making any concessions for those who may have come two movies too late into this franchise.

The film begins with a daring train rescue, where the friends rescue some of the other “immunes” who WCKD (pronounced as Wicked) wants, so as to use them as guinea pigs in its search for a cure to a virus that is destroying human kind. However, one of those among Thomas’s original rebels, Minho (Ki Hong), remains missing, and hence he leads the others deep into WCKD territory to rescue him.

All that you can imagine in the course of that rescue, from zombies to faceless security men, ambitious scientists to selfish corporates, greedy mercenaries to blood-thirsty generals, stands in their way.

In between, The Death Cure plugs a parable on walls, and leaders who hope to keep out the great unwashed with them. This swipe at Donald Trump is more serious than in other films of such genre. And The Death Cure does try to induce a certain amount of complexity in keeping Thomas’s great love Teresa (Scodelario) unsure of his way. She still tends to side with the scientists (led by Clarkson), who think the answer lies in finding a cure than Thomas’s admittedly aimless way.

However, The Death Cure can’t really explore this to any great length given the limitations in which it operates, and given that at least twice, it has to turn to cranes or helicopters to lift a train coach and bus full of children out of harm’s way as a plot turner.

Still, as this franchise too winds to a close, some marks to it for trying.

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