Evaru movie review: A well-made whodunithttps://indianexpress.com/article/entertainment/movie-review/evaru-movie-review-rating-adivi-sesh-regina-cassandra-5910714/

Evaru movie review: A well-made whodunit

Evaru movie review: Director Venkat Ramji has done a solid job adapting the convoluted tale of love, sex and betrayal. The film is well-made visually with a strong sense of aesthetics.

  • 3.0
evaru review
Evaru movie review: The Adivi Sesh and Regina Cassandra film is the official Telugu adaptation of Spanish hit The Invisible Guest.

Evaru movie cast: Adivi Sesh, Regina Cassandra
Evaru movie director: Venkat Ramji
Evvaru movie rating: 3 stars

Evaru is the official Telugu adaptation of Spanish hit The Invisible Guest. Writer-director Venkat Ramji seems to have just borrowed the basic premise of the original inspiration and has made this film his own by adding a slew of new twists and turns and dollops of family sentiment.

The movie begins with Sameera Maha (Regina Cassandra) opening fire at Ashok, a police officer. Everyone believes that Sameera killed in self-defence after Ashok assaulted her sexually. The medical reports and circumstantial evidence seems to favour Sameera. “It is an open and shut case,” Sameera tells her lawyer.

But, her lawyer knows better. A high-profile case under media scrutiny will not go away so easily without making some heads roll. The lawyer enrolls the help of Vikram Vasudev (Adivi Sesh), a police officer who has no qualms in taking bribes.

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Vikram meets Sameera inside a hotel suite, where he tries to prepare his client to get her story straight in the murder case before she appears before the judge the next day. On the surface, the case is fairly simple: Ashok raped Sameera. And Sameera shot Ashok in self-defence and in vengeance. Or is it?

I have not seen the Spanish film and I am not sure how faithful Venkat has remained to the original film. But, unlike The Invisible Guest, it is not the lawyer of the accused that drives the narration. It is a police officer who slowly unravels the mystery that is shrouded in lies and deceit. And the central story of the film also seems to be different from the Spanish whodunit.

Evaru unfolds in a series of flashbacks narrated by both Vikram and Sameera. Vikram’s findings and the information that he holds moves the story forward. Sameera’s account, however, keeps changing based on the circumstance. She retracts her lie and changes her version of events as every time her trust in Vikram grows a bit stronger.

There are a few loose ends, however. Not in the murder mystery but in the script. And, discussing that details in this review may spoil the movie for those who haven’t seen it yet.

Ramji has done a solid job adapting the convoluted tale of love, sex and betrayal. The film is well-made visually with a strong sense of aesthetics. The background score by composer Sricharan Pakala blends well with the main emotion that drives the plot and makes the visual more appealing.