Aisa Yeh Jahan movie review

Aisa Yeh Jahan movie review: It has a nice premise. But its execution is amateurish.

Rating: 1.5 out of 5
Written by Shubhra Gupta | New Delhi | Published: July 24, 2015 1:06:09 pm

Aisa Yeh Jahan, Aisa Yeh Jahan review, Aisa Yeh Jahan movie review, Aisa Yeh Jahan cast, Aisa Yeh Jahan release, Aisa Yeh Jahan movie, Palash Sen, Ira Dubey, Kymsleen Kholie, Yashpal Sharma, Tinnu Anand, Bishnu Khargaria, Biswajeet Bora, entertainment news Aisa Yeh Jahan review: The movie which calls itself ‘India’s first carbon neutral film’, and which wants to talk up ecology and conservation, and the joys of going-back-to-nature, has a nice premise. But its execution is amateurish.

This film, which calls itself ‘India’s first carbon neutral film’, and which wants to talk up ecology and conservation, and the joys of going-back-to-nature, has a nice premise. But its execution is amateurish.

Young Assamese couple Rajib and Ananya Saikia ( Sen and Dubey) live in the concrete jungle of Mumbai, with their little daughter, and a teenage house help. He is good-natured and understanding; she is not a bad sort but sharp of tongue, and Pakhi ( Kholie) longs for the day she will be re-united with her mother in her village.

The director, a former assistant of Jahnu Barua, labours to tell us that cities are impersonal and anti-nature. It is the villages, and their residents, that have an appreciation of real emotion. No arguments with that argument, and the film’s attempts at calling attention to the North East, criminally neglected in ‘mainstream’ movies.

But to stuff in so many superfluous songs, and clichéd characters and situations, does a disservice both to the film and the idea behind it. Fresh-faced Kymsleen Kholie’s Pakhi is the best part of ‘Aisa Yeh Jahaan’, but you can’t help feeling uneasy when you see an entire feature film revolve around a child who is a `labourer’, so to speak, even though the film begins with a disclaimer, stating its position against ‘child labour’.

Apart from Kholie, when you see Bishnu Khargaria ( a familiar face from Barua’s films) amongst the others who are patently not Assamese, you realise the difficulties of bringing such a subject into a full-length feature, and for an all-India audience. It is crying out to be done, sure, but better.

Cast: Palash Sen, Ira Dubey, Kymsleen Kholie, Yashpal Sharma, Tinnu Anand, Bishnu Khargaria
Director : Biswajeet Bora

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