Gully Boy box office collection Day 1: Zoya Akhtar’s film earns Rs 19.40 crorehttps://indianexpress.com/article/entertainment/bollywood/box-office-collection/gully-boy-box-office-collection-day-1-ranveer-singh-alia-bhatt-zoya-akhtar-5584265/

Gully Boy box office collection Day 1: Zoya Akhtar’s film earns Rs 19.40 crore

Gully Boy box office collection Day 1: Loosely inspired by the lives of rappers Naezy and Divine, the Zoya Akhtar directorial has got a good opening. It has earned Rs 19.40 crore on the day of its release.

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Gully Boy box office collection Day 1: The Zoya Akhtar directorial is receiving good reviews.

Zoya Akhtar directorial Gully Boy has got a double-digit start at the box office. The film has collected Rs 19.40 crore on its opening day.

Trade Analyst Taran Adarsh shared the day one collection of the film. He tweeted, “#GullyBoy is Ranveer Singh’s second biggest opener… Lower than #Simmba… Higher than #Padmaavat… Opening Day: 1. #Simmba ₹ 20.72 cr
2. #GullyBoy ₹ 19.40 cr [Thu; revised] 3. #Padmaavat ₹ 19 cr [Thu] 4. #Gunday ₹ 16.12 cr 5. #GoliyonKiRaasleelaRamLeela ₹ 16 cr India biz.”

Ranveer Singh’s Gully Boy opened to great reviews from film critics and audience alike on February 14. The fourth feature film from Akhtar’s kitty unravels the underground hip-hop scene in India and also stars Alia Bhatt, Siddhant Chaturvedi and Kalki Koechlin.

Inspired by the story of underground rappers Divine and Naezy, it has Ranveer playing the role of Murad, a young man trying to break free through his street rap. Trade analyst Taran Adarsh revealed on Thursday that the musical drama has released on 3350 screens in India and a total of 4101 screens worldwide.

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According to film trade expert Girish Johar, Gully Boy was expected to earn Rs 15 crore on its opening day and maintain its stronghold with a positive word of mouth.

The Indian Express film critic Shubhra Gupta gave the film a three and a half star rating. Shubhra wrote, “(Ranveer) Singh brings a restrained swagger to the part: there is a gentleness to his anger. His Murad shows that Singh can tamp down on his characteristic boisterousness to create something of value, even though sometimes you can see the effort show.”

She added, “But, ultimately, this is a film to enjoy. In today’s India, to bring a Murad and Safeena, their Muslim-ness a matter-of-fact statement, into centre-stage, to give traction to those who live on the wrong side of the tracks, is an act of bravery. ‘Inka time aa gaya’. Rap along.”