Court flags mistakes in FIR, New Delhi DCP declares war on error

The High Court, hearing a petition seeking quashing of an FIR, observed that “portions of the FIR are or otherwise replete with errors of syntax, semantics and spellings.” The FIR was against corporal punishment in a Kendriya Vidyalaya.

Written by Alok Singh | New Delhi | Published: August 8, 2018 4:02:20 am
The MLA was booked in March last year after a Chandigarh-based woman levelled serious allegations against him. Sources said that in the FIR, there were words like ‘treating’ instead of ‘threatening’, which irked the court. There were also various mistakes in sentence construction, sources said. (Representational Image)

With ‘stich’ taking the place of ‘stick’, ‘taimaliezed’ being used in place of ‘traumatised’, and ‘threatening’ becoming ‘treating’, New Delhi Deputy Commissioner of Police Madhur Verma has directed Station House Officers in his district to check spellings and other errors while filing FIRs.

The reason: The Delhi High Court has pointed out “errors of syntax, semantics and spellings” in a portion of an FIR filed in July in his district. The High Court had said: “Let it be brought to the notice of the DCP concerned for action as may be deemed appropriate.”

The High Court, hearing a petition seeking quashing of an FIR, observed that “portions of the FIR are or otherwise replete with errors of syntax, semantics and spellings.” The FIR, against corporal punishment in a Kendriya Vidyalaya, was registered at North Avenue police station on July 3.

Sources said that in the FIR, there were words like ‘treating’ instead of ‘threatening’, which irked the court. There were also various mistakes in sentence construction, sources said.

Taking a note of the court’s direction, the DCP, in a circular, asked officers to read the FIRs carefully before filing them. Officers should check spellings and syntax properly and structure sentences carefully, he said in the circular. When contacted, Verma said, “I have asked them to read the contents properly.”

According to police, there is a portion in the FIR called ‘rukka’, which was given to them by the complainant. “Rukka is just a complaint copy from which the contents are taken for filing FIRs. On many occasions, police officers are in a hurry and do not check spellings and errors in sentences while copying the contents. The officer should ideally check it before copying from the rukka,” said a police officer.

New Delhi district has nine police stations, each headed by an inspector-level officer.

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