Pune: Vegetable price rise leads to changes in lifestylehttps://indianexpress.com/article/cities/pune/pune-vegetable-price-rise-leads-to-changes-in-lifestyle-6109102/

Pune: Vegetable price rise leads to changes in lifestyle

Lisa Martis, a resident of Wanawadi, said the situation of the market was worrying. “All prices have gone up now. Vegetables have become so expensive. We had to look for alternatives. Since we are non-vegetarians, we have increased the amount of eggs and chicken that we buy.

Stocks of vegetables, Fifty of supplies from other state, APMC, Indian Express
A vegetable market in Pune.

Written by Rupal Jhajhria and Mitali Dhar

The skyrocketing prices of vegetables have forced changes in the lifestyle of a majority of middle-class and lower-income groups, residents of the city told The Indian Express on Thursday.

Lisa Martis, a resident of Wanawadi, said the situation of the market was worrying. “All prices have gone up now. Vegetables have become so expensive. We had to look for alternatives. Since we are non-vegetarians, we have increased the amount of eggs and chicken that we buy. We have pulses more often. We cannot stop eating vegetables, so I still buy some. For instance, we used to have methi twice or thrice a week but now that its prices have gone up, our consumption has reduced,” said Martis.

The same was also true in the case of onions, she said. “Cucumber salad is equally good and onions can be avoided by switching to alternatives such as cucumber and capsicum. While we can still deal with the prices, some sections of society are really having a hard time,” added Martis.

Shubhada Gaikwad, a resident of Manik Baug, said her family had to reduce the amount of vegetables it purchased. “Switching to alternatives like pulses, dairy products like eggs and comparatively cheaper vegetables like potatoes seems to be the only choice we have. We have sprouts more often. Onion is a vital ingredient in most dishes. But increased prices and the compromised quality of onions available in the market have compelled us to reduce its consumption. Leafy vegetables are also no longer worth the price. Vegetables like brinjal and beans are necessary. So we have to buy them despite increased prices,” said Gaikwad.