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In auto mode

An autobiography usually reveals nothing bad about its writer,except his memory,” said Benjamin Franklin. However,if the current trends in writing are anything to go by,an autobiography does reveal much more about the writer than just his memory.

Written by Shalini Rai |
July 16, 2009 2:22:43 am

An autobiography usually reveals nothing bad about its writer,except his memory,” said Benjamin Franklin. However,if the current trends in writing are anything to go by,an autobiography does reveal much more about the writer than just his memory. Among them,the most obvious being a growing need among potential writers or just common people,who think they have a story worth sharing with others,to put down in writing their lives,loves and idiosyncracies.

Some such bravehearts,who say it like it is are Brig (retd) Vivek Sapatnekar,Punjab Rao Jadhav,one of the oldest lawyers in Pune,Latika Tripathi,a life coach and Sanjay Nahar of the NGO Sarhad. They all have one thing in common and that is – despite not being famous,they’ve put down their stories on paper and have received an enthusiastic response to the same. “I had many stories to tell and many interesting anecdotes to share,with friends,family and well-wishers. That was the main motivation behind publishing my life’s story in Address C/O 56 APO,Location Unknown; Reminiscences of An Army Life,” informs Sapatnekar.

Being one of the city’s oldest lawyers,at 86,Punjab Rao Jadhav felt the need to give expression to his views on everything,from the practise of law to the Indian freedom struggle. “I’ve been an avid reader and have read several books during the 86 years of my existence. Also,since I’ve had interactions with several freedom fighters,I had to document those as well,for posterity,” adds Jadhav,who is still diligently working on his autobiography and is yet to finalise a name for it.

Latika Tripathi,who has just finished writing her autobiography So Be It,says it was after going through a painful divorce nine years ago that she decided to put pen to paper. “This book had been in my mind for a long time. I wanted to tell my story to the world and may be give hope to others who were in my position,” adds Tripathi.

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For Sanjay Nahar of the NGO Sarhad,though,it was giving his random diary jottings the form of a book that led to the publication of Bonding With Kashmir (The Sarhad Story). Ask him how the book came about and he says since it’s not always possible to express your deepest thoughts,it’s best to put them down on paper. “This book is a result of the several random thoughts which were always there in my mind,but which could not find an outlet anywhere,” he informs.

However,there’s another strong driving force behind it all – the latent writer among us all,who’s just waiting for an opportunity to blossom. “I had so many interesting incidents to share and then there were the indelible memories of a career in the Indian Army,” says Sapatnekar.

“I knew there was a writer in me,who just needed some encouragement; with my book,just that has happened and I’m glad I took the plunge,” he adds.

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