Holy Family Hospital starts Rs 13-lakh biogas plant

To convert kitchen waste into gas for cooking purposes

| Mumbai | Published: June 3, 2018 3:25:27 am
 Holy family hospital, Mumbai hospital, Natural gas, Bio gas, Mumbai news, Indian Express MP Poonam Mahajan and MLA Ashish Shelar inaugurate the biogas plant on Saturday. (Express photo by Ganesh Shirsekar)

Taking a step towards going green, the Holy Family Hospital in Bandra on Saturday inaugurated a plant to convert over 120 kg of kitchen waste — produced daily — into biogas and liquid organic fertilisers. The plant will require 20 minutes to feed kitchen waste and generate one cylinder of gas, which will be used for cooking. Also, the hospital plans to use the liquid organic fertiliser to maintain its plants.

The 286-bedded private hospital follows Bhabha Hospital, which was the first government hospital to produce biogas for energy conservation. In Dr R N Cooper Hospital, waste water is recycled for garden and bathrooms.
Felix Fernandes, the finance director at Holy Family, said the plant — which covers an area of over 1,000 sq ft — has been set up at a cost of Rs 13 lakh.

The model for the plant has been created by Kabir Udeshi, who has implemented zero-waste production in his house for the last five years. “There is an increased realisation on the need to protect our environment. Even single households can set up a biogas plant costing  Rs 15,000 to handle kitchen waste,” he said.

MLA Ashish Shelar, who inaugurated the plant with MP Poonam Mahajan on Saturday, said waste reduction at source will cut the cost of transporting garbage to dumping grounds and also reduce pollution. “This will reduce carbon emission. Already, the Deonar dumping ground has reached its full capacity. The BMC has asked the civil aviation authority to permit it to increase its capacity,” Shelar said, adding that Pali Hill residents in Bandra are also setting an example by using their waste to produce electricity.

“This is a small project but a big step towards saving the environment. We need more such projects to handle waste,” said Mahajan.

Dr Neeraj Uttam Chandani, Medical Director of Holy Family, said: “The hospital produces huge amount of waste that can now be tackled at source. We don’t have to wait to hand it over to the BMC. The plant is odourless and compact, so hygiene and sanitation issues are also taken care of.”

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