Govt hospitals told to rid premises of mosquito-breeding spotshttps://indianexpress.com/article/cities/mumbai/govt-hospitals-told-to-rid-premises-of-mosquito-breeding-spots/

Govt hospitals told to rid premises of mosquito-breeding spots

The direction was given to all general, civil, sub-district and women hospitals in the state last week.

Also, the department has written to civic bodies across the state asking them to follow suit.
Also, the department has written to civic bodies across the state asking them to follow suit.

The public health department, in a first, has asked its officers to take stock of mosquito-breeding spots within government-run hospitals and rid the premises of such places. The direction was given to all general, civil, sub-district and women hospitals in the state last week.

“Patients come to hospitals for treatment. They should not contract diseases there. We have hence asked all the hospitals to be checked. We will receive a report from the hospitals in a week,” said Sujata Saunik, Principal Secretary, Public Health.

Preparing for the monsoon, the department has also urged its colleagues in various  government departments, including home, urban development, housing and water resources, to check the public infrastructure that comes under their purview. Also, the department has written to civic bodies across the state asking them to follow suit.

“There are police colonies, terraces of Maharashtra Housing and Development Authority (MHADA) buildings that could have stagnant water deposits. They will have to be checked and cleaned, if necessary, so that they do not become breeding spots for mosquitoes,” Saunik said.

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She added that the other departments were urged to carry out the assessment by the health department on World Malaria Day on April 25. “Some departments have responded positively, but since the correspondence was made less than a month back, others are yet to respond,” Saunik said.

“We had found mosquitoes breeding on some hospital premises. So this year we have asked all the hospitals to examine their premises to identify such spots and assess the requirement for land-filling or cleaning them out,” said Dr Satish Pawar, Director, Health Services.

He said the malaria-prone pockets had been identified by the government authorities as ‘Mumbai and around’ and ‘Gadchiroli and around’. The reasons for the areas becoming hotbeds for the deadly disease are, however, different.
Pawar said if the premises of hospitals were rid of mosquito-breeding water deposits, it would help curtail not only malaria but also dengue and Japanese Encephalitis.

mayura.janwalkar@expressindia.com