Mumbai: BMC’s new STPs to follow stricter discharge normshttps://indianexpress.com/article/cities/mumbai/bmcs-new-stps-to-follow-stricter-discharge-norms-5819786/

Mumbai: BMC’s new STPs to follow stricter discharge norms

After a petition was filed by Pune-based activist in National Green Tribunal (NGT) against the norms set by the ministry, tendering of the BMC’s ambitious plan of setting up upgraded STPs at seven location was stayed.

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Under Mumbai Sewage Disposal Project-II, the BMC has proposed to upgrade seven sewerage zones to cater to the sewage discharge of the city for the next 25 years at a cost of Rs 15,000 crore. (File)

The BMC has decided to follow stricter discharge norms while setting up its sewage treatment plants (STP). Earlier, the civic body followed norms set by the Union Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEF), as per which, BOD (Bio Chemical Oxygen Demand) of 20mg/l was allowed for effluent discharge. It now plans to change it to 10mg/l.

After a petition was filed by Pune-based activist in National Green Tribunal (NGT) against the norms set by the ministry, tendering of the BMC’s ambitious plan of setting up upgraded STPs at seven location was stayed.

Municipal Commissioner Praveen Pardeshi said, “We can go ahead with norms directed by the court. We are going make all our STPs with discharge norms of 10 mg/l BOD. Our aim is to get blue coloured sea water in the next three years. Currently, over 2,500 million litre of untreated sewage is dumped in the sea daily.”

An official said that BMC has appointed consultants to construct the STPs. “Now, we will ask them to revise the tenders according to the 10mg/l BOD norms. This means that treated sewage can be reused for non-potable purpose,” the official added.

Under Mumbai Sewage Disposal Project-II, the BMC has proposed to upgrade seven sewerage zones to cater to the sewage discharge of the city for the next 25 years at a cost of Rs 15,000 crore. Delay in construction of STPs could be detrimental for Mumbai’s coastal water and marine environment, as the quality of sea water near the city is already deteriorating due to primary treatment of sewage