BMC to ask MbPT, SRA to manage their own wastehttps://indianexpress.com/article/cities/mumbai/bmc-to-ask-mbpt-sra-to-manage-their-own-waste-5535944/

BMC to ask MbPT, SRA to manage their own waste

In this regard, the civic body will write to both the planning authorities regarding segregation and organic waste composting centres to be provided in their jurisdiction.

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Currently, Mumbai daily generates 7,500 metric tonne of waste, of which 3,000 metric tonne is dumped in Kanjurmarg, 2,000 metric tonne at Deonar and 1,500 metric tonne at Mulund dumping ground. (Express Photo)

By Sanjana Bhalerao

After bulk generators, the BMC now wants planning authorities like the Mumbai Port Trust (MbPT) and the Slum Rehabilitation Authority (SRA) to manage on their own the waste generated in areas under their jurisdiction, in a bid to reduce the amount of garbage reaching the city’s three dumping grounds.

In this regard, the civic body will write to both the planning authorities regarding segregation and organic waste composting centres to be provided in their jurisdiction.

As MbPT’s 20-year Development Plan (DP) for 966 hectares along the city’s east coast is open for suggestions and objections till January 26, the civic body has suggested that land be reserved for segregation and organic waste conversion units. Similarly, SRA has also been asked to make similar arrangements in their jurisdiction.

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Main aim: Reduce amount of garbage reaching landfills

With an aim to reach 70 per cent waste segregation and reduce the quantity of garbage reaching the three landfills in the city, the BMC is starting to assign responsibility. Taking a serious note of Solid Waste Management Rules, 2016, it wants the residents to segregate waste at the source before handing it over to the collectors. With this move, in over a year, the BMC has claimed to reduce the amount of waste going to the dumping grounds by 2,500 metric tonne daily.

The DP caters to an area of 966 hectares, where MbPT is the Special Planning Authority (SPA). It proposes several projects, including open spaces, recreation parks, ecological parks, tourist hubs, restaurants, central business district, affordable housing projects and a Marine Drive-like promenade.

“The idea behind this letter is to reduce the garbage transported to the dumping grounds. With the bulk generators, we are aiming at local segregation and processing of waste. As these two (SRA and MbPT) are SPAs, we simply want them to start managing the waste generated in their areas,” said Municipal Commissioner Ajoy Mehta.

The Solid Waste Management Rules, 2016, mandate segregation of waste at source in order to channelise the waste by recovery, reuse and recycling. Waste generators would now have to segregate waste into three streams — biodegradables, dry (plastic, paper, metal, wood, etc) and domestic hazardous waste (diapers, napkins, mosquito repellants, cleaning agents, etc) before handing it over to the collector.

Currently, the city daily generates 7,500 metric tonne of waste, of which 3,000 metric tonne is dumped in Kanjurmarg, 2,000 metric tonne at Deonar and 1,500 metric tonne at Mulund dumping ground. Last month, the Maharashtra Pollution Control Board had given its nod to the scientific processing of waste and reclamation or recovery of 24 hectares of the Mulund landfill.