A ‘makeshift’ Bhagwati Hospital in Mumbai, for this monsoon

As the building comes under the C2 category buildings, it was hastily evacuated after the collapse of the Dockyard Road building in September 2013.

Written by Akanksha Kashyap | Mumbai | Published: June 16, 2016 2:23:14 am
Mumbai, Mumbai hospital, Mumbai rains, Mumbai monsoon, Bhagwati Hospital, Mumbai Bhagwati Hospital, Mumbai news, India news The reconstruction of the main building, which was built in 1968, will require two more years for completion. (Express Photo)

With the reconstruction of Bhagwati Hospital in Borivli dragging on for almost a decade now, the BMC has decided to enter into a makeshift arrangement — a temporary building — to manage all the problems that might knock their doors in the area for at least this year’s monsoon.

The reconstruction of the main building, however, will require two more years for completion. Built in 1968, the Bhagwati Hospital is the only civic hospital in the area and was meant to cater to the five lakh population of Borivli and 3.6 lakh in Dahisar.

The plan for its reconstruction was made in 2006 but the tender was passed only in 2009.

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As the building comes under the C2 category buildings, it was hastily evacuated after the collapse of the Dockyard Road building in September 2013. C2 category buildings are considered weak yet repairable.

While the hospital maintains an ambulance for emergency cases, patients are not being treated at the hospital presently. They are taken three kilometres away to closest civic hospital in Kandivli, which already caters to the huge population of Malad, Kandivali and Goregaon.

The temporary building, with 110 beds, will be open for patients in the next 15 days.

“For now, we will open an out-patient department too,” said Dr Pradeep Jadhav, in charge of peripheral hospitals.

During monsoons, civic-run hospitals face more than 100 per cent occupancy and bed shortage with patients getting admitted for fever and water-borne diseases.

The temporary hospital will only be available for patients suffering from monsoon-related illnesses. “No surgical aid is going to be provided here. In fact even if a patient has a fracture, the hospital won’t be able to provide him with necessary medication,” said local corporator Shubha Raul.

According to a senior BMC administrator, the delay in hospital construction was caused due to FSI norms that limited the height of the building to 30 metres.

“Since a hospital requires space for OPD, OTs and various departments, the FSI restrictions caused a lot of problems. Now that the government has relaxed the FSI norms, we can go ahead with the construction of the building,” the civic official said.

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