19,172 mosquito breeding sites across Mumbai destroyed since January: BMChttps://indianexpress.com/article/cities/mumbai/19172-mosquito-breeding-sites-destroyed-since-january-bmc-5849545/

19,172 mosquito breeding sites across Mumbai destroyed since January: BMC

This comes on the heels of the city registering its first dengue death this year on July 20, that of a 32-year-old Mulund resident. In Mumbai, cases have increased from 919 in 2015 to 1,003 in 2018.

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The monsoon has led to a spike in cases of dengue this month with eight recorded by the health department in the first fortnight of July. (Representational Image)

DHARAVI AND Mahim, under G-North ward, recorded the highest number of mosquito breeding sites at 4,123, followed by S ward, covering Bhandup and Powai, at 2,578 and K East that covers Andheri (East) at 2,150, as per data released by the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC).

This comes on the heels of the city registering its first dengue death this year on July 20, that of a 32-year-old Mulund resident. In Mumbai, cases have increased from 919 in 2015 to 1,003 in 2018. In the same period, suspected cases significantly rose from 12,447 to 14,110 cases.

According to the civic body, it has destroyed 19,172 mosquito breeding sites across the city since January in a bid to curb dengue and malaria.

The monsoon has led to a spike in cases of dengue this month with eight recorded by the health department in the first fortnight of July. In the same period, 146 malaria cases have also been recorded. In June, 310 malaria and eight dengue cases were recorded.

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Data also shows that out of 68.8 lakh houses that were inspected, 18,420 spots in residential societies, commercial buildings and government offices were found to have breeding sites of the Aedes Aegypti, known to spread dengue.

In 3,752 places, the insecticide department found and destroyed breeding sites of the Anopheles mosquito, which is the malaria vector. The city witnessed heavy rainfall towards the end of June followed by a dry spell in July. “The mosquito’s life cycle is seven to eight days, from larval to adult stage. With a dry spell, the rainwater becomes stagnant allowing larvae to develop into an adults,” said Dr Padmaja Keskar, executive health officer, BMC. She added that water must be drained out from household articles, such as flower pot plates, containers and tarpaulin sheets.

On Wednesday, following heavy rain, insecticide officers say all breeding sites destroyed in the last few days now pose a fresh risk of allowing the breeding of mosquitoes.