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Mohali Joyride collapse: Organiser operated joyride without taking safety certificate, finds probe report

The Mohali administration is considering making changes in the process to grant permissions for operation of joyrides and other machinery for entertainment ahead of the festive season.

As many as 16 people were injured after the joyride had collapsed from a height of around 50-feet at the Mohali Trade Fair. (File)

A probe report submitted by a special panel in Mohali September 4 joyride crash incident has found that the organisers did not take safety permissions.

As per reports, though, the organisers had actually sought safety permission from the Public Works Department (PWD) in August this year. The report also states that the organisers had all other permissions to organise the fair from August 6 to September 11.

On September 4, a joyride had collapsed at Dussehra ground in Phase VIII — leaving the local administration scrambling to find answers and fix responsibility — even as the Mohali police rushed to arrest the organiser of the fair and two of his accomplices. All the accused are currently out on bail.

As many as 16 people were injured after the joyride had collapsed from a height of around 50-feet at the Mohali Trade Fair.

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Soon after the incident, Mohali Deputy Commissioner (DC) Amit Talwar had constituted a three-member probe team, headed by Additional Deputy Commissioner (ADC) Amaninder Kaur Brar. The team submitted its probe report on Wednesday and also made some recommendations regarding the process of granting permissions to joyrides in the future.

Deputy Commissioner Amit Talwar confirmed to The Indian Express that he had received the probe report and will go through it and also see what recommendations were made and what kind of measures are to be taken in the future.

Sources told The Indian Express that the report had found that the fair’s organisers had taken permission for installing the joyride. The permission for the same was granted subject to the condition that the organiser got a safety certificate from the concerned department — the PWD.

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The report also found that the organiser had applied for getting the permission for the safety certificate from PWD in July but the department had responded in August saying that the mechanical wing of the department, which was supposed to ensure the safety of the joyride, had been disbanded. Following this, the organisers had gone ahead and installed and started operating the joyride without a safety certificate.

The report had also found a portion of the joyride, which had been welded together, came apart due to which the incident occurred.

Changes in granting permissions likely

Meanwhile, the Mohali administration is also considering making changes in the process to grant permissions for operation of joyrides and other machinery for entertainment ahead of the festive season. The administration, sources said, may not give permission to any temporary joyrides any more.

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According to sources, there is a proposal to grant permissions in two parts.

In the first, the nod will be installation of equipment or machinery for entertainment purpose. The second permission will be for operating the machinery, like swings, which could endanger the safety of people. The permissions would include safety certificates from the concerned department, fire department and permissions from GMADA, civic body and the local police.

The administration might also bring in a clause wherein a machinery, if installed, will need to be operated and monitored by the organisers themselves and not outsourced.

At present, organisers of fairs just have to take safety permission once.

First published on: 30-09-2022 at 09:14:24 am
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