‘Women no longer steer their children towards moral values’

With fond memories in her eyes,a student of 1947-batch of Government College for Women,Bhavish Rai is the oldest alumnus of GCW today.

Written by Sameer Kumar Sharma | Ludhiana | Published: February 16, 2009 3:11:26 am

With fond memories in her eyes,a student of 1947-batch of Government College for Women,Bhavish Rai is the oldest alumnus of GCW today. She was the student of the first batch of the college which passed out in 1947,the year India got Independence.

Remembering how her batch pushed their demand for a girls’ college in the city,which was established in 1943,she says it was the determination of a few girls who wanted to study further that helped in setting up a women’s college in the city.

Not happy with the way women are moulding their lives these days and not playing their role in the society effectively,she says,“The future of the society lies in their hands,but women have forgotten their role. Consequently,the value system has also gone for a toss,” she rues.

“There is a lack of independent thinking among people today and women are not able to pass on good values to their children. This is the reason why there is so much corruption and violence in the society,” she

remarks,blaming the past generations for failing to transfer good values and principles in life.

Remembering the old days of college,she says their batch comprised 25 girl students,which was instrumental in convincing the leaders and influential gentlemen of the state in that time in order the setting up of a girl’s college in the city.

“There were not even enough schools in the region. After we passed out from school,we wanted to pursue our studies further and made a demand for a college well before we finished school. Initially,there were only two lecturers and a dozen girls who wanted to study further. The first principal of the college,Sudha Sen who had come from Lahore used to visit people and ask them to send their daughters to college,” she recalls,recalling the memories of an era gone by.

“That was the time when the purdah system was prevalent in the country. But my father was completely against it and my mother wanted me to gain good education. My parents were progressive thinkers and passed on those values to me,” she adds.

“When somebody comes to me and tells me that my son is a good orator or is an honest man,I feel proud of the fact that I was able to good transfer values to him,” she beams,referring to her son Harish Rai Dhanda.

For all the latest Ludhiana News, download Indian Express App

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement