Kolkata International Film Festival: Faced no govt interference on creative side, says Aussie filmmakershttps://indianexpress.com/article/cities/kolkata/kolkata-international-film-festival-faced-no-govt-interference-on-creative-side-says-aussie-filmmakers-5443251/

Kolkata International Film Festival: Faced no govt interference on creative side, says Aussie filmmakers

Total 26 films from Australia are being screened at KIFF, including an eight-film retrospective on Philip Noyce and a Contemporary Australian Cinema section.

Kolkata film festival, Australian films, films screened at KIFF, Contemporary Australian Cinema section, Indian express 
24th Kolkata International Film Festival. (Source: File Photo)

The government of Australia does not interfere in the creative side of film-making, members of the Australian delegation said at the 24th Kolkata International Film Festival (KIFF) on Monday.

Australia is the focus country at the KIFF which is also celebrating 100 years of cinema Down Under.

“The government does not exercise real censorship. If you can raise money to make a film, no matter what the content is, you can make it. It is an open market guided by the commercial aspect. The government does not interfere in the creative side,” said director Phillip Noyce, who is a part of a large delegation from Australia.

Another member of the delegation said there is a classification board which recommends certain grades to films.

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“The board classifies the films as G, PG, M, R and the film-makers are supposed to adhere to that. If they don’t adhere to it, they get fined,” said Mitu Bhowmick Lange, producer of the Indian Film Festival of Melbourne (IFFM).

Total 26 films from Australia are being screened at KIFF, including an eight-film retrospective on Philip Noyce and a Contemporary Australian Cinema section.

“It is phenomenal being here in Kolkata, the home of Satyajit Ray, the greatest film-maker of the 20th century, someone whose films are really loved in Australia. His work has inspired many of the film-makers of the world,” Noyce said.

Noyce said one of the highlights in Australian film industry in recent years have been the emergence of films on the indigenous community “who have been denied a voice for 200 years.” With PTI