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Tuesday, November 30, 2021

Punjab: Initial CCEs witness highest ever paddy yield to date, but bad weather destroys farmers’ dreams of bumper crop

Untimely rains coupled with hail storms again in the middle of harvesting stage on October 23-24 spoiled the crop and now the remaining crop cutting experiments will show whether the yield remains same or decreases.

Written by Anju Agnihotri Chaba | Jalandhar |
November 8, 2021 3:25:42 am
Punjab, paddy, Paddy procurement, rainfall, hail storm, paddy harvesting, harvest, crop cutting experiments, Punjab agricultureDespite having 1.53 per cent of the geographical areas of the country, Punjab produces 11 per cent rice of the country and 2.6 per cent of the world. (Express File Photo)

DESPITE INCLEMENT weather at the start of paddy harvesting — which started from October 1 due to delayed monsoon, which withdrew by October 9-10 — in the initial crop cutting experiments, Punjab has witnessed a 1.4 quintals increase in yield per hectare. The results of around 20 per cent crop cutting experiments (CCEs) were received so far from across the state and these results show the highest ever average yield of paddy in the history of the state.

But the untimely heavy rains coupled with hail storms again in the middle of paddy harvesting stage on October 23-24 has spoiled the crop, which was supposed to be bumper this year, and now the remaining crop cutting experiments will show whether the yield remains same or decreases.

Despite having 1.53 per cent of the geographical areas of the country, Punjab produces 11 per cent rice of the country and 2.6 per cent of the world. Its contribution of rice to the national pool was 25-30 per cent in the last one decade.

According to information procured by the Punjab agriculture department, 20 per cent CCEs have witnessed an average yield of the state at 6775 kg (6.775 tonnes) per hectare which is 1.44 quintals is more per hectare than the average yield of last year where it was recorded 6631 kg (6.631 tonnes) per hectares.

In the history of the state, this is the highest ever yield per hectare as before this, last year and in the year 2017-18, paddy yield was 6,631 kg and 6,516 kg, respectively. Punjab’s paddy yield since 1960-61 to 1970-71 was between 1553 to 2,774 kg per hectare and then yield started increases from 1980-81 when it was recorded at 4,099 kg per hectare. Then 1990s onward it had increased to 5,265 kg and then remained between 5,700 to 6,100 kg per hectare in the past around three decades barring 2017-18, 2020-21 and now this year till date.

“We were expecting a bumper crop but October 23-24 rain and hail storm has shattered our dreams. Now we will see how much we get because our crop got damaged badly,” said farmer Amrik Singh of Sultanpur Lodhi.

Paddy and Basmati crops have been flattened over a large area and the Punjab agriculture department is getting the details of this damage.

The state conducts 2,200 to 2,300 crop cutting expeditors across its 23 districts every year.

There are 142 agricultural blocks in the state and crop cutting experiments ranging from 28 to around 200 are conducted in each block depending upon the sizes by the department.

Bhartiya Kisan Union (BKU) Dakunda General Secretary Jagmohan Singh said that due to recent rain, they have demanded proper girdawari (physical assessment of the field) of the damaged paddy and Basmati because at some places farmers suffered heavy yield loss for which government must compensate.

Meanwhile, Punjab has completed harvesting on around 85 per cent of the total area till date as 149.92 lakh tonnes paddy has already arrived in the state mandis till November 5.


This year, Punjab is expecting arrival of around 190 lakh tonnes of paddy.

The are around eight districts of the state where high yield is expected which included Sangrur, Patiala, Ludhiana, Barnala, Moga, Mansa, Bathinda, Muktsar where Pusa-44 paddy, the long duration variety, is sown over a large area and the yield of which is between 36-40 quintals per acre and 88-98 quintals (8,000 kg to 9,800 kg) per hectare.

But there are several districts where yield remains low also due to sub-mountainous and soil type where yield remains around 5,000 to 5,500 kg per hectare.

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